Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 13:10:18 -0500 (EST)
To: aaswliststsci.edu
Cc: cmustsci.edu, knezekstsci.edu
Subject: AASWOMEN for 02/01/01

	AAS Committee on the Status of Women
    weekly issue of 02/01/2001, ed. by Meg Urry and Patricia Knezek

This week's issues:
1. How to Subscribe to AASWOMEN
2. Article on Universities Addressing Sex Inequities
3. Article on Women in the Technology Industry
4. A Book for Women Interested in Pursuing a Ph.D.
5. Book Reviews
6. Correction to You-Hua Chu article in January, 2001 Status
7. Comments from Lynda Williams in reply to response from APS Congressional 
   Fellow Sherri Stephan in 01/05/01 AASWOMEN regarding Lynda Williams letter
8. An Anecdote to Complement the Letter to the University of Chicago Press
   in AASWOMEN 01/24/01 by Londa Schiebinger and Robert Proctor
9. Donate a Mammogram (NOT a joke)

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1. How to Subscribe to AASWOMEN
From: Meg Urry & Pat Knezek

Presumably if you are receiving this email, you have already subscribed to
the AASWOMEN weekly newsletter.  However, we thought we'd write it down here
in case someone asks you!  If you wish to subscribe to AASWOMEN, all you need
to do is email Majordomostsci.edu.  In the BODY of the message (NOT the 
subject line, that line is not processed), type:

subscribe aaswlist youremailaddress

That's all there is to it!  Then if you wish to unsubscribe, again, email
Majordomostsci.edu and type in the BODY of the message:

unsubscribe aaswlist youremailaddress

You should receive an automatic message from the Majordomo welcoming you to 
the listserver (or telling you that you have successfully unsubscribed).  If 
you have any problems, you can always email us at aaswomenstsci.edu.

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2. Article on Universities Addressing Sex Inequities
From: Kris Sellgren

[Eds. Note: Kris Sellgren pointed out an interesting article which appeared 
in the New York Times on how nine universities plan to address sex inequities.
Readers may remember the topic of class-action lawsuits was introduced in the
AASWOMEN 12/13/00 issue.]

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/31/national/31WOME.html?ex=981965595&ei=1&en=0d36a2dd708860aa

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3. Article on Women in the Technology Industry
From: Lauretta Nagel

[Eds. Note: Lauretta Nagel has drawn attention to an interesting article which 
appeared on CNET news.com on how our counterparts in the Technology Industry
are doing in terms of their careers.]

http://news.cnet.com/news/0-1007-200-4496059.html

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4. A Book for Women Interested in Pursuing a Ph.D.
From: Andrea Schweitzer

[Eds. Note: Andrea Schweitzer sent the following information on this book.
She also included an excerpt that is too long to print in the AASWOMEN
newsletter.  However, if you are interested in reading the excerpt, please
contact us at aaswomenstsci.edu, and we will email it to you.]

THE WOMAN'S GUIDE TO NAVIGATING THE PH.D. IN ENGINEERING & SCIENCE, by 
Barbara B. Lazarus, Lisa M. Ritter, and Susan A. Ambrose.  Copyright, 2001, 
IEEE Press.

It is designed to help women doctoral students survive and thrive in
graduate school.  Much of the book is useful to graduate students in all
fields.

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5. Book Reviews
From: Kevin Marvel

In the January-February issue of American Scientist (pg 89) there are two book 
reviews of potential interest to your committee membership and the readers of 
Status.  The first is entitled "The Door in the Dream: Conversations with 
Emminent Women in Science" by Elga Wasserman and the second is on the book 
"Women Becoming Mathematicians: Creating a Professional Identity in Post-WWII 
America" by Margaret A. M. Murray.  Both seem like excellent books from the 
reviews and the reviews themselves are nice to read.

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6. Correction to You-Hua Chu article in January, 2001 Status
From: Bob Hanisch

I'd like to offer a minor correction to the article by You-Hua Chu 
about the editors of AAS journals that appeared in the most recent 
issue of STATUS. [Ed. note: You-Hua's article quantified the relative 
scarcity of women editors over the history of the premier astronomy 
journals (STATUS, January 2001).] According to the AAS bylaws, the role 
of the AAS Publications Board in the selection of editorial staff of 
the AAS journals is limited to providing advice to Council. 
It is the Council that actually appoints the Editor. Scientific 
Editors and Associate Letters Editors of the ApJ and the Associate 
Editor of the AJ are also appointed by the Council, following nomination 
by the respective Editors-in-Chief in consultation with the Publications 
Board. 

The distinction between advising and selecting is more than just 
academic, as in the past recommendations made by the Publications 
Board have been rejected by Council. In my experience (as Pub Board 
Chair) this was unusual, but it did happen and demonstrates that the 
authority for selection of the journals' editors resides fully with 
the Council. 

Furthermore, the bylaws state that the Council may appoint other 
standing or ad hoc committees to advise it, as needed. Recently 
the Council appointed a search committee for the selection of 
an Editor-in-Chief for the Astrophysical Journal that was separate 
from the Pub Board. The search committee took its recommendations 
to the Pub Board, which in turn brought the nomination to Council. 

The Pub Board certainly plays an important role in the 
process of selecting the editors for the Society's journals, but it 
does not have the power to formally select editors for any of the 
Society's journals; only the Council can do this. 

All this said, I do hope the Society is successful in bringing more 
women into the editorial ranks of its journals! 

Bob Hanisch 
Space Telescope Science Institute 
Past Chair, AAS Publications Board (1996-1999) 

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7. Comments from Lynda Williams in reply to response from APS Congressional 
   Fellow Sherri Stephan in 01/05/01 AASWOMEN regarding Lynda Williams letter
From: Lynda Williams 

In no way did I intend to claim that APS directly and intentionally
discriminates against women. I apologize for the misunderstanding. Rather,
what I was expressing was a concern that there is a discrimination against
folks with MS degrees in both gov't and NGO's for many opportunities and
funding programs. I don't have concrete data on this but simply from years
of exploring such opportunities I have consistently been stopped by the
phd barrier. What I was hoping to communicate in my informal letter was a
frustration in that and also that this barrier may exclude qualified
people many of whom are women. The only program I have found that does not
require a phd are for engineers - which is great for engineers! I don't
think it is an outrageous observation to say that in general, if you want
to do policy or PI a grant, you have to have a phd or have a tenure track
position which usually requires a phd. I may be wrong but that was the
point of posting my informal letter - not to attack the integrity of any
org but to bring up what I feel (as an MS) is a critical issue in the
political structure of science and the opportunites that are available for
MS degrees, which are quite if not most often women. Many folks replied to
me privately and encouraged me to apply anyway. Thanks for your
encouragement!

Happy New Year!

******************************************************************************

lwilliamstars.sfsu.edu                       San Francisco State University
Lynda Williams                               Physics and Astronomy Department

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8. An Anecdote to Complement the Letter to the University of Chicago Press
   in AASWOMEN 01/24/01 by Londa Schiebinger and Robert Proctor
From: Marian Bruinvels

What about this very Dutch anecdote:

I often show audiences this 1958 book: "Physics Experiments at Home for Boys 
and Girls" in a Dutch translation "Physics at Home, physics experiments for 
boys" (Natuurkunde Thuis, natuurkundeproeven voor jongens). "Jongens" in 
Dutch means "Boys". It is unbelievable, but true.

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9.  Donate a Mammogram (NOT a Joke) 
From: Kris Sellgren

I'm passing this along from a friend.  It only takes a second. All you do is 
go to the site below, click a button and a woman gets a free mammogram at no 
cost to you. It is paid for by corporate sponsors (who gain advertising in 
the process because you see their logo.) You're only allowed one donation so 
please pass the word. 
 
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com 

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