AAS Committee on the Status of Women
    Weekly issue of 04/27/01, eds. Meg Urry & Patricia Knezek 

This week's issues:

1. New issue of STATUS will be out soon
2. Attention to the status of women in science in France
3. Further comments on CSWA goals and Kelle Cruz's posting on 4/20/01
4. Links to information about careers in astronomy
5. Information on available learning tools in physics and astronomy 
   aimed at children around 12 years old (request posted 4/20/01)
6. Conference Announcement on Disks of Galaxies
7. To submit to, subscribe to, or unsubscribe from AASWOMEN (repeat)

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1. New issue of STATUS will be out soon

The sixth issue of STATUS edited by Meg Urry and Lisa Frattare (STScI)
will be out soon. (STATUS is the newsletter of the Committee on the 
Status of Women in Astronomy.) Look for the June 2001 issue in your 
mailboxes and at the June AAS meeting in Pasadena. If you are not 
already receiving STATUS by mail ***and especially if your department 
does not already get a copy to display for students*** you can subscribe 
by sending your mail address(es) to Dennis Renner (drenneraas.org). 
Dennis is the new Membership Coordinator with the AAS and he will 
be taking care of the STATUS distribution. 

Read STATUS --- it's brilliant! (we say modestly). Past issues are available 
on-line at www.aas.org/cswa/pubs.html (as are past issues of AASWOMEN).

The June 2001 STATUS will include the following articles: 

	Evaluation of the Status of Women, by Andrea Dupree

	Women in Science at U.S. Universities: Criticism and
	Defense of the MIT Report, by Meg Urry

	The Charge of The Association for Women in Science (AWIS), 
	by Catherine Jay Didion and Kelly Meeker 

	What You Don't Know Can Hurt You: Non-logical dimensions to being 
	a woman scientist, by Kristy Dyer 

	Perspective from the Biological Sciences, by Diane Hoffman

	"Women and the Work/Family Dilemma" Book Review, by Ann Wehrle

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2. Attention to the status of women in science in France

From: Bob Milkey milkeyaas.org

[This is an excerpt from FAST (FRENCH ADVANCES IN SCIENCE 
AND TECHNOLOGY), a twice-weekly free review of mainstream 
French press on issues of science and technology (see
http://france-science.org/english/).]

Dateline: Paris - April 5, 2001 - Issue #247

WOMEN IN SCIENCE

Although at the CNRS there are quite a number of them--10,700 
compared to 14,600 of the other kind-more glaring discrepancies 
are seen as one climbs the ladder. Of 1st Class senior scientists 
there are 830 men compared to 130 women. To address this and other 
imbalances related to gender, CNRS director Genevieve Berger has 
inaugurated a standing committee called "Disciplines, Fields, Careers, 
and Gender" whose first task will be collecting and listening 
to a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative data on the 
particular pressures on female scientific careers as a first step 
to taking appropriate measures. (Agence France Presse, March 27)

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3. Further comments on CSWA goals and Kelle Cruz's posting on 4/20/01

From: Amanda Baker Amanda.Bakerastro.cf.ac.uk

Greetings,

Re: An opinion on what the goal(s) of the CSWA should be
> From: Kelle Cruz 

> My definition of the fundamental problem is that the "system" treats
> women and men differently because of the different roles society has
> forced on us.

	I agree with much of what Kelle says, but I'm not sure about this
statement. My perception is that the _individuals_ who, between them,
make up the 'system' treat other _individuals_ in subtly differing
ways which can enhance or limit career progression. Some of these
behaviours are biased against women, sometimes in ways which depend
upon the social roles which women tend to adopt. But I don't feel that
we are going to get to the root of the problem if we are simply
looking for sex discrimiation (which I define as, preferential
treatment of males versus females). 

	It appears to me that there are certain 'types' of people who
tend to succeed in many walks of life, and although many of the
successful individuals are (white, able-bodied, Christian...) males,
it isn't _purely_ a sex thing, although there are certainly time and
place where there is still clear discrimination against women. In the
UK and the US, and in public and in writing at least, the 'system' is
increasingly required to be seen to treat everyone equally. However,
what does equal treatment actually mean? Every aspect of career
development depends upon the little decisions made on a day-by-day
basis, which gradually accumulate along the way to a good job, or a
series of short-term contracts which eventually fizzle out. Do the
senior staff develop positive opinions of the work, working style,
personality, social interactions, prospect, commitment etc. of their
junior colleagues? Do the junior staff make the right connections,
collaborations, impressions, life choices, professional decisions
(with or without good advice)? If your face doesn't fit, for whatever
combination of reasons, at the end of this process, then tough luck to
you, female _or_ male.

	If the CSWA is going to get to the root of the problems in
astronomy, we are going to have to understand a lot more about the
true nature of the problems, which appear to be fundamental to
society.

	Not very easy, but there you go,

	Thanks,

	Amanda Baker

--
N2.03 x 5121	a.bakerastro.cf.ac.uk	www.astro.cf.ac.uk/pub/Amanda.Baker
Dept. Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, PO Box 913, Wales CF24 3YB
Code: +44 (29) Tel: 2087 5121 (direct) 2087 4458 (secretary) 2087 4056 (fax)

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4. Links to information about careers in astronomy

I threw together a web page that summarizes all the links I found in
AASwomen newsletters for information about careers in astronomy. Anyone 
is welcome to copy it (Meg, Pat: hint, hint) or link to it.  I welcome 
suggestions for links to add (or subtract, if some seem not useful).  

  http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~sellgren/career.html

It's not fancy, so I also welcome *concrete* suggestions for changes 
to make it more welcoming and/or more useful.  By concrete, I mean HTML 
code, URLs and/or images, not "add a nice background" or "XYZ University
has a good website".  I'm well-intentioned, but not really very web-savvy
or HTML-literate :)  In fact, if someone wants to take this and run
with it, make it really great with lots of images etc., feel free!

Kris Sellgren, Astronomy Dept., Ohio State

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5. Information on available learning tools in physics and astronomy 
aimed at children around 12 years old (request posted 4/20/01)

From: Zodiac Webster zodiacastro.berkeley.edu

The Project ASTRO activities guide "The Universe at Your
Fingertips" is full of hands on projects in astronomy.
Project ASTRO is sponsored by the Astronomical Society of
the Pacific (www.aspsky.org). Even the activities targeted
towards younger kids can be used on a 12 year old if you
don't _tell_ the 12 year old they are doing an activity
for 4th graders! The activities are organized by topic and
each topic has an introduction that includes how the
content fits in with overall educational standards by
approximate grade level. 

Enjoy. 
zo webster

*******

From: Jay.M.Pasachoffwilliams.edu

I recently did a 7th-grade astronomy textbook for Prentice-Hall.  
It is called Science Explorer-Astronomy (ISBN 0-13-434478-2) and 
should be on a good level. People that age also use my Peterson 
First Guide to Astronomy and Peterson First Guide to the Solar System.
  I just checked, and you can get the textbook from amazon.com. I
searched on the ISBN number. I will add it to www.solarcorona.com,
where there will be a direct link within a day.

  Jay Pasachoff, jay.m.pasachoffwilliams.edu

*******

Ed.: Here's another suggestion for online materials for 
a young astronomer. Although this site is aimed at college 
level students, it's likely to be accessible to younger 
people as well: 
	http://cosmos.colorado.edu/tools/

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6. Conference Announcement on Disks of Galaxies

From: Lia Athanassoula  (liapaxi.cnrs-mrs.fr)

DISKS OF GALAXIES : KINEMATICS, DYNAMICS AND PERTURBATIONS

Puebla, Mexico, 5-9 November 2001

For more information and a list of topics go to
http://www.inaoep.mx/~disks01
or email
disks01inaoep.mx

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7. To submit to, subscribe to, or unsubscribe from AASWOMEN

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   send email to aaswomenstsci.edu 
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