Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 16:47:26 -0400 (EDT)
To: aaswliststsci.edu
Cc: aaswomenstsci.edu
Subject: AASWOMEN for June 15, 2001


AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Weekly issue of 06/15/01, eds. Meg Urry & Patricia Knezek

This week's issues:

1. A new book on Maria Mitchell
2. A request for a reviewer of the new book on Maria Mitchell for STATUS
3. Comments on Debra Rolison's talk at the June 2001 AAS, and a request
   for information
4. No women to Mars?
5. An article on Heidi Newberg's experiences as a woman physicist
6. The Ground-Based O/IR System working committee
7. AAS Councillors and officers added to AASWOMEN distribution list
8. Survey on Women in Physics (fwd)
9. The CORRECT way to submit or subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

Ed. note: 
A reminder that we are going to bi-weekly issues of AASWOMEN through August.
And also, please see #9 for the CORRECT way to subscribe or unsubscribe to
AASWOMEN, as there was an inadvertent error in the 06/01/01 issue.

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1. A new book on Maria Mitchell
From: Debra Elmegreen ELMEGREENvassar.edu

I wanted to call attention to a new book, "Maria Mitchell: A Life in Journals
and Letters" by Henry Albers, College Avenue Press, ISBN 1-883551-89-7;  370
pages, with 33 photos. I have watched Henry (retired astronomy professor from
Vassar) write this book for over a decade, collecting correspondence and notes
from around the world by and to Maria Mitchell, America's first woman
astronomer. The book is a marvelous compilation, and provides a fascinating
look at late 1800's science and conditions for female scientists.  The book is
available by phone, 800-974-5533, College Avenue Press, PO Box 76, Clinton
Corners, NY 12514 or CollegeAvePressaol.com, or as a signed copy from Henry   
Albers, 8810 Leabrook St., Fairhope, AL 36532, halberszebra.net.  It is $27.95
plus $2 shipping, but they are offering a 10% discount for AASWOMEN readers.
Happy reading!
Debra Elmegreen                                                                 

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2. A request for a reviewer of the new book on Maria Mitchell for STATUS
From: Meg Urry cmustsci.edu

Henry Albers (halberszebra.net) has [also] written AASWOMEN to announce
the imminent publication of his book about Maria Mitchell. (He was
formerly the Maria Mitchell Professor of Astronomy at Vassar College.)
Prof. Albers writes that his book "contains archival material, 
[Mitchell's] journals, letters, speeches, etc.; as much as I could 
squeeze into 350 pages and still make sense. Also some 20 pictures 
are included."

We would like to have a review of this book for STATUS, and Prof. 
Albers is willing to supply a review copy gratis. If you are interested
in writing a review for the January 2002 STATUS (due date September 
2001), please contact Meg Urry immediately (cmustsci.edu).

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3. Comments on Debra Rolison's talk at the June 2001 AAS, and a request for
   information
From: Alycia Weinberger alyciaastro.UCLA.EDU

I found the portions of Debra Rolison's talk at the AAS regarding search
committees very interesting, especially since I've just been through an
intensive 9 months of job hunting.  Last year, in response to one of those
all-too frequent "You won't have any trouble finding a tenure-track job
since you're a woman" comments, I did a little "metastudy" of the
astronomy gossip site and submitted it to this newsletter (July 5, 2000).
I found that women seemed to be getting tenure-track jobs in proportion to
their representation in the new PhD pool.  (The rumor page put up a link        
to that newsletter, and, somewhat to my chagrin, I have discovered that
this seems to be my most widely read publication.)
 
Recently, 20% of PhDs in astronomy have gone to women, so a typical short
list of five people should have one woman. In any given year, departments
will fall prey to small number statistics.  Over time, however, it could
be quite apparent if some departments interviewed shamefully few women, if
only that information on their interview habits existed.
 
I am the first to admit that the rumor page is hardly a bastion of
accurate information, and I have experienced first hand some of its
negative consequences for job-hunters. However it provides the only public
data on university short lists.  In order to make my metastudy more
accurate, and in order to find out if there are departments out there with
particularly poor search practices, I therefore ask you all to submit
what you know about your own university's search.  I'll do the counting
and report back.
 
--Alycia Weinberger
                                                                                
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4. No women to Mars?
From: Steve Kilston skilstonball.com

Dear Women,
 
Meg Urry asked me to send you all the news item reprinted below from the BBC
News website
(http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_1371000/1371037.stm),
along with my proposed solution to the "problem"  --  to avoid  "conflicts"     
between the sexes/genders, just send an all-women crew.
 
Yours,
 
Steve Kilston
 
skilstonball.com  (please direct any replies to this address instead of
simply hitting the "reply" button)
-----------------------------
 
Wednesday, 6 June, 2001, 10:33 GMT 11:33 UK
 
No women on Mars trip
 
A Russian mission to Mars could take place in 20 years
 
By BBC News Online science editor Dr David Whitehouse
 
Women are likely to be barred from any Russian mission to Mars
because they would increase the "probability of conflicts" among the            
crew, says a Russian space official.
 
Anatoly Grigoryev, Director of the Institute of Medical and
Biological Problems, says that such a mission, if funded, could
take place between 2015-2020, but there would be many potential
problems.
 
Among them is the composition of the crew for the three-year
mission. According to Dr Grigoryev there would be four or
five people going: a commander, a pilot, a doctor and scientists.
 
But probably no women. Dr Grigoryev says that a single-sex
crew is likely to be more "serene" with a lower probability of conflicts.
 
Space brawl
 
Although their space effort is stretched and grossly underfunded,
some Russian space experts still have big dreams and hopes that
when things get better they may have a thriving, independent,
space programme once more.                                                      
 
"The manned flight to Mars is a super-task," says Dr Grigoryev,
"but it is quite workable technically. Certainly, there are still details to
be worked on for the next few years."
 
He believes that the basic plan for a manned Mars mission has been
worked out.
 
It would consist of a number of rocket launches to assemble a large
spacecraft in Earth-orbit. It would take nine months to travel to Mars
where a small landing craft would touch down on the Red Planet.
 
After three months on the surface, there would be another nine-month trek
back.
 
"The food question is serious," Dr Grigoryev says. "A food reserve
for two years will take up too much space, so it cannot be carried
from Earth. The cosmonauts will have to grow their own food."
 
Space quails                                                                    
 
To this end, the Institute for Medical and Biological Problems has
conducted a series of experiments on the now defunct Mir space
station.
 
But those experiments only raised quails and grew wheat. Much
more work on providing food in space needs to be done.
 
According to Dr Grigoryev, the crew for the long Mars mission will
have to be selected differently from the way Russia currently
selects its spacefarers.
 
They will have to be screened more thoroughly to see how they would
cope with being so far away from Earth, living closely with several
others for so long.
 
"Everything may happen within two years of the flight: from appendix
problems to a brawl," he says.
 
But if Dr Grigoreyev's views hold sway; the fights will not be about            
women.
 
BBC News Online
                                                                                
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5. An article on Heidi Newberg's experiences as a woman physicist
From: Heidi Newberg newbehrpi.edu

I recently gave a talk at the April APS meeting in the session on 
"Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics."  In the talk, I discussed some 
of the experiences I have had as a woman in physics (and astronomy).  I have 
made the text of the talk available to anyone who is interested at the 
following web site:
 
http://www.rpi.edu/~newbeh/rrwp.htm
 
Best Wishes,
Heidi Newberg
heidirpi.edu                                                                   

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6. The Ground-Based O/IR System working committee
From: Luisa Rebull luisa.rebulljpl.nasa.gov

I attended the [June AAS] session on Thursday at lunch about the optical/ir 
`system' that is being discussed now.  (The AAS booklet summary was confusing 
[see http://www.aas.org/meetings/aas198/program/events.html#oir ]), but the
bottom line is that they are discussing a decadal survey recommendation
that basically suggests making a portion of every observatory in the US,
public and private, available to open merit-based competition, in exchange
for, say, money for instrument development.  They have a website which is
still pretty skeletal at http://www.noao.edu/system/ ) At any rate, at the
session Thursday, they put up a list of people on their working committee.
NOT ONE WOMAN.  I raised my hand and asked where the women were.  They
said they'd asked several but that none had accepted the invitation, and
that they would be looking for more women soon.  Incidently, the committee
is not listed on their website.  The other website given at the workshop
but apparently not yet valid or linked in is
http://www.noao.edu/gateway/system_workshop .
 
Sigh.
 
Luisa                                                                           

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7. AAS Councillors and officers added to AASWOMEN distribution list
From: Meg Urry cmustsci.edu

Note that AAS Councillors and Officers, if they were not already
subscribers, have been added to the AASWOMEN distribution list,
as per discussion at the AAS Council meeting in Pasadena.

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8. Survey on Women in Physics (fwd)
From: Kris Sellgren sellgrenastronomy.ohio-state.edu

Comment: the e-mail address to send the survey to is given in the website.

Kris Sellgren

*************************************
Rachel Ivie, AIP:
".....This study is part of an effort to learn about the experiences of
women in physics and how their experiences differ across countries. The
study is sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics'
Working Group on the Status of Women in Physics.

We are sending the attached questionnaire to women in physics all over the
world.  I am asking your help in completing the questionnaire and returning 
it to us.  We also need your assistance in getting the questionnaire out to 
as many women physicists as possible. Please forward it to your colleagues 
and ask them to complete it and return it to us. Your assistance is very 
valuable to us, because we do not have very many contacts in Sweden.

Once the study is complete, the results will be presented at an international
conference on Women in Physics in order to ensure that the participants have 
a clear understanding of the issues facing women in physics. All of the 
information provided will be kept confidential. Only aggregate statistics will 
be distributed. If you have any questions, please contact me or Marcia 
Barbosa, chair of the IUPAP Working Group on Women at barbosaargento.bu.edu. 
More information about this project can be found at
http://www.if.ufrgs.br/~barbosa/conference.html.

Thank you very much for your assistance with this important project.

Yours,

Rachel Ivie

American Institute of Physics"

**********************************************************************

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED PHYSICS
SURVEY OF WOMEN PHYSICISTS
MAY 11, 2001

IDENTIFICATION AND BACKGROUND

1.  Name:

2.  Affiliation or employer:

3.  Position:

4.  Country in which you are employed:

5.  Age:

6.  Are you

[ ] Female
[ ] Male

7.  Highest degree:

8.  Subject of highest degree:

9.  Year of highest degree:

10.  How would you rate the quality of high school teaching of physics in your
country?

[ ] better than most subjects
[ ] the same as most subjects
[ ] worse than most subjects
[ ] no opinion

11.  When did you first think of choosing physics as a career?

[ ] before high school
[ ] during high school
[ ] during undergraduate school
[ ] during graduate school

12.  Your decision to choose physics was influenced by (you can mark more than
one):

[ ] parents
[ ] teachers
[ ] interest in the subject
[ ] other, please specify

13.  Did you have any female scientists as role models?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, how did you learn about them?

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

14.  Country in which you obtained your undergraduate degree:

15.  Subject of undergraduate degree:

If not physics, skip to 20.

16.  Do you recall approximately how many physics majors were at your
undergraduate department?

[ ] yes; How many?
[ ] no

17.  Approximately how many women were physics majors in your department?

18.  Compared to the other undergraduate students in your program, what level
of attention do you feel you received from your physics professors?

[ ] overall I received more attention than the other students
[ ] overall I received the same amount of attention as the other students
[ ] overall I received less attention than the other students

19.  Would you say that the attention you received from your professors was
positive, negative or neutral?

[ ] positive
[ ] negative
[ ] neutral
[ ] I received no attention

GRADUATE STUDIES

20.  Did you obtain a graduate degree?

[ ] yes
[ ] no, skip to 32

21.  Country in which you obtained your graduate degree:

22.  Was your advisor female or male?

[ ] female
[ ] male

23.  Did you have difficulties finding an advisor?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, why?

24.  How would you rate the quality of your relationship with your advisor?

[ ] excellent
[ ] good
[ ] fair
[ ] poor

25.  Compared to other graduate students in your program, how would you rate
your relationship with your advisor?

[ ] better
[ ] the same
[ ] worse

26.  Do you recall approximately how many graduate students were in your
program?

[ ] yes; How many?
[ ] no

27.  Approximately how many of the graduate students in your program were
female?

28.  During your graduate studies were you (you can mark more than one):

[ ] asked to present a poster/talk in a conference
[ ] asked to write a research paper on your own
[ ] asked to co-author a research paper
[ ] introduced into the scientific community in some other way
[ ] none of the above

29.  When was your first research visit to a foreign country?  This does not
include attending graduate school in a foreign country.

[ ] before my graduate studies
[ ] during my graduate studies
[ ] after I completed my highest degree
[ ] I have not participated in a research visit to a foreign country; skip to
31

30.  Who arranged this visit?

[ ] my advisor
[ ] contacts of my advisor
[ ] I made the contact by myself

31.  In graduate school, did you have a mentor other than your graduate school
advisor?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, was your mentor female or male?

[ ] female
[ ] male

CAREER

32.  After completing your highest degree, did you work as a postdoc?

[ ] yes
[ ] no, skip to 35

33.  If you worked as a postdoc, did you work in:

[ ] an academic department
[ ] a research institute
[ ] somewhere else, please specify

34.  How many years did you spend as a postdoc?

35.  Are you employed in academia?

[ ] yes
[ ] no, skip to 42

36.  Do you have tenure (or a permanent position if your institution does not
have tenure)?

[ ] yes
[ ] no, skip to 40

37.  In what year did you first get tenure (or a permanent position if your
institution does not have tenure)?

38.  Compared to your colleagues, how long would you say it took you to get
tenure (or a permanent position) after the time you received your final
degree?

[ ] more time than my colleagues
[ ] about the same amount of time as my colleagues
[ ] less time than my colleagues

39.  If it took you more or less time than your colleagues to get tenure (or a
permanent position), why?

40. For how many students have you served as graduate advisor?

41.  How does the number of graduate students you have advised compare with
other faculty in your department who are at similar stages in their careers?

[ ] more
[ ] about the same number
[ ] less
[ ] my institution does not have graduate students
[ ] no one else at my department is at a similar career stage

42.  When did you start working at your current job?

43.  Why did you take your current job?

44. Compared to your colleagues in similar positions or at similar stages of
their careers, do you have more or less of the following?

3 = I have more
2 = I have about the same amount
1 = I have less
0 = does not apply

[ ] funding
[ ] office space
[ ] lab space
[ ] equipment

45. How does the quality of the following compare to that of your colleagues
in similar positions or at similar stages of their careers?

3 = I have better
2 = I have about the same quality
1 = I have worse
0 = does not apply

[ ] office space
[ ] lab space
[ ] equipment


46.  Have you participated in the following? You can mark more than one.

[ ] served on a steering committee for a conference
[ ] advised undergraduate students
[ ] served on thesis or dissertation committees (not as advisor)
[ ] served on important committees at your institute or company
[ ] served on committees for grant agencies
[ ] acted as a referee for a research journal
[ ] served as editor or associate editor of a journal
[ ] given a talk at a conference as an invited speaker

47.  For those activities in which you have participated, how often have you
participated in them compared to your colleagues who are at similar stages in
their careers?

3 = more than my colleagues
2 = the same amount as my colleagues
1 = less than my colleagues
0 = does not apply

[ ] served on a steering committee for a conference
[ ] advised undergraduate students
[ ] served on thesis or dissertation committees (not as advisor)
[ ] served on important committees at your institute or company
[ ] served on committees for grant agencies
[ ] acted as a referee for a research journal
[ ] served as editor or associate editor of a journal
[ ] given a talk at a conference as an invited speaker

48.  Compared to colleagues who completed their final degree at the same time
as you, how quickly have you progressed in your career?

[ ] more quickly
[ ] about the same
[ ] more slowly

49.  Would you say you have had a mentor in your career?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, was your mentor female or male?

[ ] female
[ ] male

PERSONAL ASPECTS AND OPINIONS

50.  Did you get married? When?

[ ] yes, during or before my undergraduate studies
[ ] yes, during my graduate studies
[ ] yes, after I received my final degree
[ ] no

51.  Did this affect your work?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, how?

52.  Do you have children? When were they born?

[ ] yes, during or before my undergraduate studies
[ ] yes, during my graduate studies
[ ] yes, after I received my final degree
[ ] no

53.  Did this affect your work?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, how?

54.  Do you know any women in your country who left (gave up) physics?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, why did they leave physics?

55.  Do you think the situation of women physicists in your country needs to
be improved?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

If yes, what do you think could be done to improve the situation of women
physicists in your country?


56.  Think back on your education and the early years of your career.  What
specific opportunities, support, or advantages helped you achieve the success
you have today?

57.  Would you choose physics again?

[ ] yes
[ ] no

Please comment.


Feel free to provide any additional comments to clarify your answers or to
provide more insight about being a woman physicist in your country.  We would
also welcome comments about the survey.

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9. The CORRECT way to submit or subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN

[Eds. note: We inadvertently gave incorrect instructions for both 
subscribing and unsubscribing to AASWOMEN in the 06/01/01 issue.  Please
note that you must include your ENTIRE email address, not just your 
user name, in order to subscribe or unsubscribe (see below).  The 
instructions on how to submit to AASWOMEN remain unchanged.  We apologize
for any inconvenience.]

To submit to AASWOMEN:
   send email to aaswomenstsci.edu
   All material sent to that address will be posted unless
        you tell us otherwise (including your email address).

To subscribe to AASWOMEN:
   send email to majordomostsci.edu, with message in the BODY
        subscribe aaswlist yourusernameyouremailaddress

To unsubscribe to AASWOMEN:
   send email to majordomostsci.edu, with message in the BODY
        unsubscribe aaswlist yourusernameyouremailaddress
 
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