Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2002 20:56:55 -0500 (EST)
To: aaswliststsci.edu
Subject: AASWOMEN for February 15, 2002
Cc: knezeknoao.edu, meg.urryyale.edu


	AAS Committee on the Status of Women
    Weekly issue of 02/15/2002, ed. by Meg Urry and Patricia Knezek

This week's issues:
1. (Washington Area) WiA meeting features Dr. Ed Weiler, Assoc. 
   Admin of NASA OSS
2. New report on increasing diversity in science/technical workforce
3. CHE article on lower tenure rates for women with children
4. Family issues the focus of June 2002 STATUS

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1. (Washington Area) WiA meeting features Dr. Ed Weiler, Assoc. 
   Admin of NASA OSS

For those in the Washington area, the next meeting of 
Women in Aerospace features NASA's own Ed Weiler, Associate 
Administrator for Space science, talking about "Space Nuclear 
Power, the Future of Space Telescopes, and other Priorities 
for 2003 and Beyond". This event is being held on the morning 
of Wednesday February 20, 7:30-9:30 a.m. (EST), in Room 2325 
of the Rayburn House Office Building, Independence Ave. and 
S. Capitol St. SW. A continental breakfast will be served 
from 7:30-8, followed by the program from 8-9 and follow-up 
discussion from 9-9:30. Join WiA for what promises to be a 
very interesting meeting. 

[Ed. note: It was not clear whether an RSVP was required;
contact infowomeninaerospace.org for more information.]

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2. New report on increasing diversity in science/technical workforce

from WIPHYS on 2/13/02:

A new study from the GE Fund focuses on increasing diversity in
quantitative careers. The report offers data and recommendations
on preparing under-represented groups for careers in science,
engineering, and technology that documents obstacles and
solutions for improving minority and female student performance
in pursuing careers in science, engineering, and technology.
http://www.edc.org/spotlight/Equity/upping.htm

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3. CHE article on lower tenure rates for women with children

The Chronicle of Higher Education ran a discouraging article 
on tenure rates for women who have children early in their careers; 
see http://chronicle.com article entitled "Women Who Have Children 
Early in Careers Hurt Their Chances to Achieve Tenure," by Thomas 
Bartlett, Tuesday, February 12, 2002.

The articles quote the authors of a recent study, "Do Babies Matter: 
The Effect of Family Formation on the Life Long Careers of Women," 
Mary Ann Mason and Marc Goulden (UC Berkeley), who found that "women 
who had at least one child before completing five years of post-Ph.D. 
work were 24 percent less likely in the sciences" to get tenure 
compared to men who became fathers during that time. (The new fathers 
were even more likely to get tenure than men who did not become fathers! 
Does this suggest that perhaps their wives stayed home to take care 
of the baby and also to smooth the mens' lives, whereas in childless 
couples the woman might be working outside the home?)

Another surprising statistic: only half of tenured women in the
sciences have children in their households.

This "baby gap" appears to be independent of the size of the
institution.

On the positive side, the authors of this study had clear recommendations
that could ameliorate the difficulties faced by women trying to raise
a family while working toward tenure. Their study is a clear sign that 
colleges and universities will have to take positive action to
redress this family-issue imbalance for women if they want to attract and
retain the best scientific talent.

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4. Family issues the focus of June 2002 STATUS

Editors Lisa Frattare and Meg Urry anticipate that the June 2002 STATUS
will focus on family issues, and their effects on the progress of women
in science. 

Input for STATUS is always welcome. If you know of relevant articles or 
would like to contribute to this issue, please contact the editors 
(frattarestsci.edu, meg.urryyale.edu).

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