Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 18:58:53 -0500 (EST)
To: aaswliststsci.edu
Subject: AASWOMEN for Friday, October 25, 2002

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Weekly issue of Oct. 25, 2002, eds. Meg Urry, Patricia Knezek, 
& Michael Rupen

This week's issues:

1. The cost of Introductory Astronomy text books
2. Obituary for Dianne Prinz
3. Postgrduate Scholarships at the Research School of Astronomy and
   Astrophysics, The Australian National University
4. Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics, Vanderbilt University
5. Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University
6. Instructor in Physics , Vanderbilt University

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1. The cost of Introductory Astronomy text books
From: Margaret Hanson hansonphysics.uc.edu

To all Astro101 Instructors,

Have you ever taken note of the cost of the text books you require for your 
course? If not, I think you should. I was absolutely floored this week when 
I found out the textbook I had planned to use for a one-quarter course, a 
softbound textbook, would run $111. I've emailed one of the authors and I've 
emailed the publisher that I refuse to use it. It's not just the price that's
got me so upset, but this endless re-issuing of new editions for minor 
changes every 12 - 18 months renders our student's used books worthless.

In my email to the publisher, I told them it's a bit surprising that in an 
era when educational websites, government agencies, observatories and the 
like are making astronomy lessons and astronomy images abundantly available, 
that textbook companies would be so confident as to overprice their books as 
they are.

These companies depend on us being unaware of the cost to our students. I 
urge you to be aware.

This spring, I will simply use my web-based lecture notes and the countless 
websites I have found to teach my course.

-- 
Margaret M. Hanson, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Physics
University of Cincinnati http://www.physics.uc.edu/~hanson/

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2. Obituary for Dianne Prinz
From: Judy Karpen judy.karpennrl.navy.mil

To view the entire article, go to
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A49907-2002Oct18.html

Dianne K. Prinz; Space Scientist For Naval Research Laboratory

By Graeme Zielinski

 Dianne Kasnic Prinz, 64, a space scientist for the Naval Research
Laboratory, where she worked from 1967 until retiring because of illness
in 2000, died of lymphoma Oct. 12 at the Hospice of Northern Virginia in
Arlington. She had lived in Alexandria since 1967.

 In the 1970s, Dr. Prinz was the first woman selected to be trained as
apayload specialist by NASA and she was scheduled to be sent into space
before her flight was canceled after the 1986 Challenger explosion.

 She led research in the 1970s that resulted in obtaining pictures of
the Sun's ultraviolet radiation. And since the 1980s, she supervised
work that measured the sun's ultraviolet output, establishing an
important baseline currently in use by astrophysicists to determine
changes in the sun.

 She worked in a field dominated by men. In the early 1970s, when she
was an official involved in a satellite launch at the White Sands
Proving Grounds in New Mexico, Dr. Prinz had to improvise, because there
were no women's restrooms.

 In a 1978 interview with The Washington Post, she recalled in
amazement that a NASA official asked her if she had any makeup requests
for her upcoming space mission.

 That mission, to oversee an experimental payload called SUSIM (Solar
Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor), was canceled, though the
device, highly anticipated by space scientists, was later launched in
1991.

 In the Post interview, Dr. Prinz said she was attracted to science as
achild growing up the daughter of a coal miner on a farm outside
Pittsburgh. "There were lots of chemicals around, so I got interested in
chemistry," she said.

 She won scholarships to the University of Pittsburgh, where she
received a bachelor's degree in physics. She later received a doctorate
in physics from Johns Hopkins University.

 Her awards included a Navy Award of Merit for Group Achievement, the
NASA Public Service Group Achievement Award and the Navy Meritorious
Civilian Service Award.

 She was a member of the Washington Academy of Sciences and Sigma Xi
and had been vice president of the Washington chapter of the Optical
Society of America.

 Dr. Prinz volunteered for the Navy Community Outreach Program and gave
lectures about space research in her NASA flight suit at schools in the
Washington area.

 Her marriage to Gary Prinz ended in divorce.

 Survivors include her father, Joseph Kasnic of Conway, Pa.; a sister;
and a brother.

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3. Postgraduate Scholarships at the Research School of Astronomy and
   Astrophysics, The Australian National University
From: Theresa Gallagher theresa.gallagheranu.edu.au

RESEARCH SCHOOL OF ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS MOUNT STROMLO OBSERVATORY THE 
AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

Funding is available now for postgraduate study in 2003 in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) at 
The Australian National University.  You will be part of a world-class team
in observational, theoretical and instrumental astronomy and astrophysics.
You will have access to the most powerful telescopes in Australia and 
overseas and you will be supervised by astronomers at the top of their field 
worldwide. 

Funding is available for postgraduate study in 2003, including prestigious 
stipend scholarships valued at $AUD23,609 tax free per annum, to be awarded
to outstanding Australian or international scholars. 

Located on Mt Stromlo, the RSAA runs five telescopes at two observatory 
sites and is building Australia's first instrument for the giant Gemini 8m 
telescopes.  The RSAA has Australia's largest grouping of astronomers, the
most comprehensive set of undergraduate and graduate astronomical courses,
and has trained many of the world's leading astronomers residing in the 
United States, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. 

To learn more go to: http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/education/   or email: 
school.secretary.rsaa.anu.edu.au

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4. Professor of Theoretical Astrophysics, Vanderbilt University

From WIPHYS posting of 10/25/02

The Department of Physics and Astronomy invites applications and nominations 
for a tenure/tenure track faculty position in theoretical astrophysics. 
Applicants will be considered at all professorial levels.  There are no
restrictions on the subfield of theoretical astrophysics, but candidates 
whose work complements observational areas already being pursued will be of 
particular interest. Active astrophysics research areas within the department 
include galactic, planetary, and protoplanetary nebulae, supernova cosmology,
star and planetary system formation, and binary and variable stars. Our
astrophysics thrust is supported by groups in particle physics, cosmic rays 
and particle astrophysics and by strong computational facilities. The 
successful candidate is expected to have an outstanding, internationally 
recognized and highly visible research record and will be expected to 
establish a strong and vigorous research program in theoretical astrophysics 
at Vanderbilt. In addition, the candidate must have an established record of
excellence in undergraduate teaching and the ability to teach effectively and 
contribute to the expanding curricular offerings in graduate level 
astrophysics. Potential applicants are invited to request more information 
from the Search Committee and to visit our web site at 
http://www.physics.vanderbilt.edu/. This position is available beginning as 
early as September 1, 2002.  Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and 
available teaching evaluations and arrange for four confidential letters of 
reference to be sent to:
Professor David A. Weintraub
Chair, Astrophysics Search Committee
VU Station B Box 351807, Vanderbilt Place
Nashville, TN, 37235-1807
E-mail: david.a.weintraubvanderbilt.edu 
FAX: (615) 343-7263.

A review of applications will begin on July 1, 2002 and will continue until 
the position is filled. Vanderbilt University is an Equal Opportunity, 
Affirmative Action Employer. Women and minority candidates are particularly 
encouraged to apply.

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5. Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University

From WIPHYS posting of 10/25/02

Nominations and applications are sought for an outstanding leader with 
proven administrative and communication skills to assume the position of 
Professor and Chair, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt 
University. A Ph.D. in physics or a closely related area, a significant and 
distinctive record of research accomplishments and a history of quality 
teaching are required. The department presently has twenty nine professorial 
lines, federal funding of $6.4 million/year, and approximately 55 graduate
students. Active funded research areas include theoretical and experimental 
programs in atomic/molecular/optical physics, materials and condensed matter
physics, biological physics, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, 
and particle physics.  The department also is active in several 
interdisciplinary programs, including the W. M. Keck Foundation Free Electron 
Laser Center, the Vanderbilt Institute for Nanoscale Science and Engineering,
the Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education. 
An on-campus high performance computer farm facility is shared among the 
Department, the Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, and the Biochemistry
Departments. Nominations or applications can be sent to:
Prof. Charles Maguire, Chair,
Search Committee
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Station B Box 351807
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, TN 37027-1807
Phone: 615-322-2828
E-mail: charles.f.maguirevanderbilt.edu.

A review of the candidates will begin on January 30, 2000 and will continue 
until the position is filled. Vanderbilt University is an equal-opportunity,
affirmative action employer. Women and minority candidates are encouraged to
apply.

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6. Instructor in Physics , Vanderbilt University

From WIPHYS posting of 10/25/02

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Vanderbilt University invites 
applications for an Instructor position in physics. The Instructor will be
primarily involved in teaching undergraduate physics laboratories. The 
position is open beginning in the Spring 2003 semester. The position is 
non-tenure-track. The initial appointment will be for twelve months and is 
renewable for subsequent years. At least a bachelors degree in physics is
required. Applicants should have excellent communication skills and be 
familiar with Windows based computers. Applications should be sent to:
Prof. A. S. Umar
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Station B Box 351807 (for express mail, replace with 6301
Stevenson Center)
Nashville, TN 37235.

Applicants should arrange for three reference letters to be sent to the above 
address. Applications will be reviewed starting December 1, 2002, and will 
continue until the position is filled. Vanderbilt University is an Equal 
Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.  Women and minority candidates are 
particularly encouraged to apply.

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