Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 20:14:53 -0500 (EST)
To: aaswliststsci.edu
Subject: AASWOMEN for February 14, 2003

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Weekly issue of Feb. 14, 2003, eds. Meg Urry, Patricia Knezek, & Michael
Rupen

This week's issues:

1. Comments on the question of whether the timing of high school science 
   courses contribute to the leaky pipeline
2. FORWARD To Professorship Workshop
3. History of Women in Science and Engineering Survey
4. Women-Related Web Sites in Science/Technology page
5. Article in Physics Today on arrogance in Physics
6. Coming events at APS meeting in Austin
7. Faculty position in Theoretical Atmospheric Physics, University of Toronto 
8. Faculty position in Experimental Atmospheric Physics (Canada Research 
   Chair), University of Toronto 

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1. Comments on the question of whether the timing of high school science 
   courses contribute to the leaky pipeline

[Eds. note:  These are in response to Sangeeta Mulhotra's observations in
the February 7, 2003 issue of AASWOMEN.]

*********************************************
From:  Luisa Rebull rebullipac.caltech.edu

hi -

have you seen these articles in Physics Today about Leon
Lederman's efforts to rearrange the order of science in high
school?
http://www.physicstoday.org/pt/vol-54/iss-9/p11.html
http://www.physicstoday.org/pt/vol-54/iss-9/p44.html

cheers,
Luisa

*********************************************
From: Kelle Cruz kellehep.upenn.edu

I have a couple comments in response to the post from Sangeeta Malhotra on the 
timing of Physics in high school. I'm a 24 year old, 3rd year grad student and 
my memories of (public) high school are pretty clear.

Before reading Sangeeta's post, it never occured to me that I encountered 
physics after all of the other science's in high school. One thing immediatly 
came to mind -- the slow pace of the math preparation. Even though I was on the 
fast track, I didn't take Algebra II and Pre-Calculus till 11th grade. While 
Biology and Chemistry relied on memorization and simply *using* formulae, 
physics was hot and heavy algebraic manipulation! That's why physics comes last 
-- because it has math pre-reqresuites that don't get taken care of till 11th 
grade.

Looking back, Physics was the only science course that really required that you 
*know* the math. Now, wait a minute, Biology and Chemsitry at the college and 
professional levels require just as much math as astronomy does, right? So why 
is there such a big difference at the high school level? Can physics be taught 
without such advanced mathmatical tools? Well, yes. Astronomy 101, for 
non-science majors, is an example. 

In conclusion, I think Sangeeta has hit on a very good point. But it's not just 
that Physics is taught last, but that it's presented as a much more 
mathematically rigourous course than the other sciences. And, yes, this must be 
a source of a leak in the pipeline. Plus, if my logic holds up, one of the many 
possible fixes for this leak would be the dumbing down of high school Physics 
to the same mathematical level as its Biology and Chemistry counterparts.

kelle

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2. FORWARD To Professorship Workshop

> From WIPHYS Feb. 10, 2003

You are invited to attend the FORWARD to Professorship
Workshop, sponsored in part by a grant for the National
Science Foundation. The Workshop will be held May 20
to 22 in Washington DC. 

For additional information please check 

www.seas.gwu.edu/~forward/advance 

FORWARD in SEM: Focus on Reaching Women for Academics,
Research and is a joint program of the George Washington and
Gallaudet Universities, and is funded by a National Science
Foundation ADVANCE leadership award. This workshop is
provided for women and minorities who may be considering, or are
currently in, a tenure track position in science, engineering or
mathematics. The 2 1/2 day workshop will focus on skills,
strategies and "insider information" necessary to obtain a tenure-
track position, to succeed in one and advance to other positions of
leadership. This is also an opportunity to network and meet peers.
Any questions, please contact Yell Inverso at
forward.officegallaudet.edu 
 
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3. History of Women in Science and Engineering Survey

> From WIPHYS Feb. 10, 2003

Please help to write the history of women in science and engineering. Echo's 
Women in Science and Engineering project at George Mason University is 
documenting the career experiences of women scientists and engineers in 
recent memory. To this end, we have developed an online survey, allowing 
women to tell the story of their career experiences in their own words: 
http://echo.gmu.edu/wise/survey/index.php). 

Our aim is to build a rich, free and public database that serves as an 
educational tool for scientists and scholars alike. We also hope that the 
contributions will help and inspire aspiring scientists and engineers. You 
may enter the survey anonymously, or close your entry from public access. 
Please take the opportunity to tell the story of your career at:
http://echo.gmu.edu/wise/survey/index.php 

Numerous contributions by women scientists and engineers are already 
available online, and can be read at:
http://echo.gmu.edu/surveys/contributions.php?survey=wscience 

Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or suggestions. 
Thank you very much for your time and consideration.
Sincerely,
Katharina Hering, Jim Sparrow
Women in Science and Engineering Project
Echo: Exploring and Collecting History Online
(http://echo.gmu.edu)
George Mason University
Fairfax, VA
703-993- 45 85
Kheringgmu.edu; jsparrowgmu.edu 

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4. Women-Related Web Sites in Science/Technology page
From: Marlene Cummins astlibrlepus.astro.utoronto.ca

[Eds. note:  The CSWA web page is now among the pages linked through this
website.  You can also reach this website through a link FROM the CSWA
web page.  It can be found at http://www.aas.org/~cswa/links.html under
"Organizations".  We also recommend you check out another of Joan Korenman's
web sites: http://www.umbc.edu/cwit/ ]

From The NSDL Scout Report for the Physical Sciences, Copyright Internet
Scout Project 1994-2002. http://scout.wisc.edu/

  Women-Related Web Sites in Science/ Technology page
  http://research.umbc.edu/~korenman/wmst/links_sci.html

From Joan Korenman of the Department of English at the University of
Maryland comes the Women-Related Web Sites in Science/Technology page. This
great collection of Web resources contains dozens of sites that in some way
provide information on the contributions of women to science. Example sites
include the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics; Douglass Project
for Rutgers Women in Math, Science, and Engineering; Gender Equity in
Education; Girls and Women in Science; Institute for Women in Trades,
Technology, and Science; Stealing the Fire: Women Scientists in Fiction; and
more. Educators and students alike will appreciate this compilation of
important resources, which should only help to spread the knowledge and
acceptance of the important role woman play in science and technological
pursuits. [JAB]

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5. Article in Physics Today on arrogance in Physics
From: Duilia de Mello demellopha.jhu.edu

[Eds. note:  This article can also be found online at:
http://www.physicstoday.org/vol-56/iss-2/p54.html ]

Hi!

Physics Today February issue (page 54 - Opinion)
has a great article by J. Murray Gibson about

Arrogance - A Dangerous Weapon of the Physics Trade?

I highly recommend it to everyone.

Duilia

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6. Coming events at APS meeting in Austin

> From WIPHYS Feb. 11, 2003

A. CSWP/FIAP Networking Breakfast

CSWP and the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics (FIAP)
will sponsor a networking breakfast on Monday, March 3, 2003 at
the APS meeting in Austin, Texas. Padmasree Warrior, Senior VP
and Chief Technology Officer for Motorola who has made key
contributions, both managerial and technical, to the development of
innovative transistors for cellphones is the guest speaker. Her talk
entitled "Leadership Not an Exact Science!", will be followed by
a chance for discussion and networking. Cost: $20. Details and
registration at http://www.aps.org/educ/cswp/breakreg.html . 
Through the generosity of FIAP, we are able to offer
complimentary registrations to a limited number of women students
in physics!

B. Special Panel Discussion on Title IX 

Title IX, the Educational Amendment of 1972 which prohibits sex
discrimination by any educational institution receiving federal funds,
has had dramatic impacts for women athletes. What are the
implications for women in physics? In October 2002, the US
Senate held the first-ever hearing on Title IX and Science. On
Wednesday, March 5, CSWP will sponsor a special panel
discussion from 3:30-5:30 pm entitled "Women in Physics: Title IX
and the Need for Change". Speakers will include Debra Rolison
(Naval Research Lab), Catherine Didion (AWIS) and Judy Franz
(APS). The panel (Session 2A) will be held in Room 8C of the
Convention Center. Following the panel there will be an informal
reception (cash bar and light fare) in the Waller Creek Room. 
Details on the CSWP website at
http://www.aps.org/educ/cswp/panel03.html. Please join us for an
interesting discussion! 

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7. Faculty position in Theoretical Atmospheric Physics, University of Toronto 
From: Helen Smith smithphysics.utoronto.ca

The Department of Physics at the University of Toronto is pleased to announce 
the search for an Assistant Professor in Theoretical Atmospheric Physics. 
The appointment will begin as early as July 1, 2003. Besides this position, 
the Department is also strengthening its effort in Atmospheric Physics with a 
tenure stream faculty position in experimental atmospheric physics to begin 
at the same time. The Department has an active Atmospheric Physics Group with 
established research strengths in remote sounding of the atmosphere and 
measurements of chemical composition from the ground, balloons, and space, 
climate modelling and climate processes, and geophysical fluid dynamics. This 
program is complemented by strength in environmental chemistry within the 
Chemistry Department. Members of the Atmospheric Physics Group currently lead 
Canadian national programs in Climate System History and Dynamics, Global 
Chemistry for Climate, Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) 
and MANTRA (a balloon mission to study the ozone layer). Major infrastructure 
includes a NEC supercomputer, an instrument space flight test facility, an 
atmospheric observatory, and laboratory spectroscopy facilities. The Department
seeks to make an appointment that complements and extends existing strengths. 
Potential applicants are invited to visit our web sites at 
http://www.atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca and http://www.physics.utoronto.ca. We 
seek candidates with a Ph.D. in physics (or equivalent) and strong proven or 
potential excellence in both research and teaching. The salary will be 
commensurate with qualifications and experience. Applicants should submit via 
hard copy only a curriculum vitae, list of publications, research plan, and 
arrange for at least three letters of reference, to be sent to: 

Professor Henry M. van Driel, Chair 
Department of Physics 
University of Toronto 
Toronto, Canada M5S 1A7 

Applications will be reviewed beginning March 17, 2003 until the position is 
filled. The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within 
its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority group 
members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, members of 
sexual minority groups, and others who may contribute to further 
diversification of ideas. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; 
however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

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8. Faculty position in Experimental Atmospheric Physics (Canada Research 
   Chair), University of Toronto 
From: Helen Smith smithphysics.utoronto.ca

The Department of Physics at the University of Toronto is pleased to announce 
the search for an Assistant or early-career Associate (within two years of 
tenure) Professor in Experimental Atmospheric Physics. The successful 
candidate will be nominated for a Tier II Canada Research Chair. The 
appointment will begin as early as July 1, 2003. Besides this position, the 
Department is also strengthening its effort in Atmospheric Physics with a 
tenure stream faculty position in theoretical atmospheric physics to begin at 
the same time. The Department has an active Atmospheric Physics Group with 
established research strengths in remote sounding of the atmosphere and 
measurements of chemical composition from the ground, balloons, and space, 
climate modelling and climate processes, and geophysical fluid dynamics. This 
program is complemented by strength in environmental chemistry within the 
Chemistry Department. Members of the Atmospheric Physics Group currently lead 
Canadian national programs in Climate System History and Dynamics, Global 
Chemistry for Climate, Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) 
and MANTRA (a balloon mission to study the ozone layer). Major infrastructure 
includes a NEC supercomputer, an instrument space flight test facility, an 
atmospheric observatory, and laboratory spectroscopy facilities. The Department
seeks to make an appointment that complements and extends existing strengths. 
Potential applicants are invited to visit our web sites at 
http://www.atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca and http://www.physics.utoronto.ca. We 
seek candidates with a Ph.D. in physics (or equivalent) and strong proven or 
potential excellence in both research and teaching. The salary will be 
commensurate with qualifications and experience. Applicants should submit via 
hard-copy only a curriculum vitae, list of publications, research plan, and 
arrange for at least three letters of reference, to be sent to: 

Professor Henry M. van Driel, Chair 
Department of Physics 
University of Toronto 
Toronto, Canada M5S 1A7 

Applications will be reviewed beginning March 17, 2003 until the position is 
filled. The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within 
its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority group 
members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, members of 
sexual minority groups, and others who may contribute to further 
diversification of ideas. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; 
however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

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