Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 14:57:15 -0500 (EST)
To: aaswliststsci.edu
Subject: AASWOMEN for March 12, 2004

AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Weekly issue of March 12, 2004
eds. Patricia Knezek, Michael Rupen, & Jim Ulvestad
 
This week's issues:
1. NASA Workshop - Minority Participation in Space Science Missions
2. More Women in SET: Report from Institute of Physics (UK) and Daphne 
   Jackson Trust & Responses About the U.S. Numbers
3. The Women & Girls in Technology Initiative
4. Trades Program for Middle School Aged Girls
5. Deputy Director for Science and Technology, Lawrence Livermore National
   Laboratory
6. How to submit, subscribe, or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN
 
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1. NASA Workshop - Minority Participation in Space Science Missions
From: Patricia Knezek knezeknoao.edu

NASA WORKSHOP TO FOSTER MINORITY PARTICIPATION IN OFFICE OF SPACE SCIENCE
MISSIONS

The NASA Office of Space Science sincerely invites all space science
researchers and qualified scientists in closely related disciplines to
attend "Chicago 2004: A Workshop to Foster Broader Participation in NASA
Space Science Missions and Research Programs." This workshop, to be held
June 28-29, 2004, in Chicago, is a proactive response to anticipated
demographic changes in the United States that will have a profound effect
on our future space science missions and programs. By the time some of our
currently envisioned future missions are being carried out, our country
will be approaching the point where the entering workforce will be
predominantly minority. Our future success therefore depends upon our
starting now to involve individuals from groups that have traditionally
been underrepresented in NASA space science.

The workshop's premise is simple. Successful careers and collaborations
begin with personal contacts. So, broadening participation in NASA space
science begins with setting up a workshop to seed personal contacts between
scientists currently engaged in NASA space science and scientists who are
seeking to become so engaged. The expectation is that such contacts will
lead to partnerships that will grow to become true collaborations as time
goes on.

We therefore particularly encourage attendance by:

1) scientists currently involved in NASA space science missions or research
programs, including both current leaders of science teams and early career
space scientists who might become leaders of future teams, and

2) Minority University faculty, members of professional societies of
minority scientists, and underrepresented minority scientists/educators
seeking to become involved in NASA space science missions or research
programs.

Grants to partially support travel costs are available. In order to receive
full consideration, travel grant applications must be received by April 16,
2004. To apply for travel support and to register for the workshop, please
visit the Chicago 2004 Web site at http://analyzer.depaul.edu/Chicago2004/.

Further information is available at the Web site above or from Dr. Philip
Sakimoto at philip.j.sakimotonasa.gov or (202) 358-0949.
 
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2. More Women in SET: Report from Institute of Physics (UK) and Daphne 
   Jackson Trust & a Response About the U.S. Numbers
 
>From WIPHYS of March 10, 2004

New Report Shows Industry How to Get More Women into Science, Engineering 
and Technology Jobs. On International Women's Day (8 March 2004), a new 
report, explaining how the UK can stop the female brain-drain in science, 
engineering and technology (SET), is published by the Institute of Physics 
and the Daphne Jackson Trust. The report is available as a pdf file at:
http://diversity.iop.org/news/index.html 

>From WIPHYS of March 11, 2004

I never expected to be defending the numbers of women in the US getting 
PhD degrees in Science and Engineering, which should of course be higher. 
But the sentence I read in the 3R document [WIPHYS 3/10/04] from the 
(London) Institute of Physics "In the US five times as many men as women 
qualify with a PhD degree in science or engineering" is just not correct. 
NSF data show that the fraction of women getting PhD degrees in science and 
engineering rose from 27.9% (6370 women) in 1990 to 36.5% in 2001, (9303
women). At least let's have the correct numbers.

Vera Rubin, Senior Fellow
Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
Carnegie Institution of Washington
rubindtm.ciw.edu 

>From WIPHYS of March 11, 2004

The NSF report called Science and Engineering Degrees: 1966-2000 
( http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsf02327/pdfstart.htm ) Section B; Detailed 
Statistical Tables, Table 25 (Women as a percentage of all doctorate 
recipients, by major field group: 1966-2000) shows that in 2000, "women 
represented 36.2% of all doctorate recipients", but fields like psychology 
and social sciences are included. Unfortunately, in engineering, only 
15.8% PhD recipients are women (which corresponds to a 1:5 proportion of
women to men), and in physical sciences 24.6% (1:3 women to men proportion). 
Maybe it is the use of different definitions for "science and engineering 
fields" that creates confusion?

Dr. Maria Adamuti-Trache
Faculty of Education
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, Canada
maria.tracheubc.ca 

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3. The Women & Girls in Technology Initiative
From: Patricia Knezek knezeknoao.edu>

The Women & Girls in Technology Initiative (WGIT) is sponsored by the
Women's Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor and by the Women's
Center of the University of Washington.  It provides a communication
exchange system promoting the development of effective programming to
advance the participation of women and girls in math, science, engineering,
and technology-related fields.  The major components include an interactive
web site and monthly virtual conference calls (free of charge) on such
topics as "The Power of Mentoring" and "Developing Leadership Models for
Women in Technology".  For more information see: www.wgit.org

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4. Trades Program for Middle School Aged Girls
From: Liz Shayne Eshayneaol.com

Greetings -- I was hoping that you might be able to help us spread the word
about an exciting training institute taking place in Vermont this summer.

The Rosie's Girls Training Institute is intended to train teams of
individuals to pilot the Rosie's Girls Summer Program in their community.
Rosie's Girls Summer Program is a three-week summer trades day camp
designed to help middle school-aged girls develop a broader sense of
themselves and their capabilities, learn independence and self-reliance,
expand math and science skills through concrete applications, and consider
careers in nontraditional fields.

Please see below for more information about the Institute. You can also visit
http://www.nnetw.org/rgti2004.htm.

We would greatly appreciate any help you could provide in sharing this
information with your memebers and others in your community.

Sincerely,
Liz Shayne
Rosie's Girls Programs, Founding Director
Strong Foundations, Inc
Burlington, VT
802-658-5229

Rosie's Girls Training Institute: A Four-Day Experiential Retreat, July
11-14, 2004

For the second year, teams of individuals from organizations and/or
communities interested in running the Rosie's Girls Summer Program are
invited to apply to attend the Rosie's Girls Training Institute, held near
Burlington, Vermont, in July 2004. The Rosie's Girls Training Institute is
a four-day experiential training retreat intended to give its participants
the tools needed to pilot the Rosie's Girls Summer Program - a award-winning,
three-week girls' trades exploration day camp - in their communities in the
summer of 2005.


What is the Rosie's Girls Summer Program?
Rosie's Girls Summer Program is a three-week summer trades day camp designed
to help girls develop a broader sense of themselves and their capabilities,
learn independence and self-reliance, expand math and science skills through
concrete applications, and consider careers in nontraditional fields.

The camp features the following activities.
- Hands-on training in carpentry that is structured around progressively more
challenging activities, including small-scale shop-based projects and larger
community-based service projects designed to meet identified community needs.
- Special workshops that introduce participants to the tools, vocabulary,
methods, materials and safety techniques used in other trades areas such as
electrical wiring, welding, and bicycle and auto repair.
- Physically challenging activities (such as ropes courses, rock climbing and
self-defense) designed to build self-confidence and group cohesion.
- Arts activities that explore a variety of forms of self-expression
including dance, yoga, drumming, mask making, creative writing, improvisation,
and stand-up comedy.
- Activities to help girls understand the subtle (and not-so subtle) messages
that women and girls receive about how they should act, what they should look
like, who they should please and what they can become - messages that can
limit girls' options, opportunities and attitudes.


The Rosie's Girls Summer Program was created through a collaboration between
Northern New England Tradeswomen, Inc. and Strong Foundations, Inc. and was
piloted in Vermont in 2000. Administrators from 6 other states have already
been trained to bring the program to their communities.

For more information about the Rosie's Girls Summer Program and about the 
2004 Institute, visit http://www.nnetw.org/rgti2004.htm.

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5. Deputy Director for Science and Technology, Lawrence Livermore National
   Laboratory

Deputy Director for Science and Technology
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Livermore, CA

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a premier applied-science,
multi-disciplinary national security laboratory, is seeking an outstanding
individual to serve as Deputy Director for Science and Technology (DDST). The
ideal candidate will have a strong vision for research and its application to
national needs, and will be an articulate communicator with both internal and
external scientific communities. He or she will be an effective and collegial
administrator who is energetic, committed, and tireless in working with the
Laboratory Director. The Deputy Director leads the development and
implementation of the Laboratory?s strategic science and technology plan,
fosters the development of advanced concepts and practices, and oversees the
recruitment, development, and retention of highly qualified personnel. The
Deputy Director works with the Director and Deputy Director for Operations to
develop and execute institutional strategy.  The Deputy Director has overall
responsibility for the quality and health of science and technology
Laboratory-wide and has line responsibility for a $110 million institutional
portfolio including the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program,
collaborative research with University faculty and staff, and institutional
planning activities and reporting. The Deputy Director is the principal
contact for the Laboratory on science and technology matters and represents
LLNL externally to constituents such as the University of California, the
National Nuclear Security Administration/Department of Energy, DOE/Office of
Science, and peer organizations, national laboratories, universities and
private industry.

The Deputy Director will have a Ph.D. or equivalent in a scientific or
engineering discipline, have a distinguished research record, and have
demonstrated success in leading and managing significant scientific programs,
projects, or organizations. A working knowledge of the DOE/NNSA laboratory
complex and/or the nation?s nuclear weapons establishment is essential. U.S.
citizenship and ability to obtain a DOE security clearance is required.

LLNL offers a competitive salary/benefits package. To view this job, go to the
Featured Job Postings at http://jobs.llnl.gov and select this position. When
applying, reference source code ANAW384DO. LLNL is operated by the University
of California for the National Nuclear Security Administration/Department of
Energy. EOE/AA

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