Date: November 1, 2004 9:34:23 AM MST 
To: aaswliststsci.edu 
Subject: AASWOMEN for Oct. 29, 2004 

AAS Committee on the Status of Women 
Weekly issue of October 29, 2004 
eds. Patricia Knezek, Michael Rupen, & Jim Ulvestad 

This week's issues: 

1. Advice for prospective graduate students 

2. Re: Online Journal Statistics 

3. Women Who Cite Sex Bias...: article available from AAUW Web site 

4. Leaky Pipeline Data 

5. Chicago Lecture on Ruby Payne-Scott: The First Woman Radio Astronomer 

6. NSF Report on Gender and Academic Scientists' Careers 

7. Postdoctoral position at Indiana University, Bloomington 

8. Postdoctoral Positions with the Submillimeter Array, Smithsonian Astro.
Obs. 

9. Tenure-Track Position at Arizona State University 

10. Deputy Director of the NRAO 

11. Research Associate in Computational Astrophysics/Code Validation,
U-Chicago 

12. Tenure-Track Position at SUNY/Geneseo 

13. How to submit, subscribe, or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN 

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1. Advice for prospective graduate students 
From: AASWOMEN Editors 

There has been a flood of responses to Fran Bagenal's request for advice
for 
prospective graduate students.  Fran is compiling the results, and we'll 
post something here once that's done.  For now, please send any further 
postings to her at bagenalcolorado.edu . 

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2. Re: Online Journal Statistics 
[Eds. note: this is a response to Christiane Helling's request for
reliable 
  statistics regarding on-line access of journal articles.] 
From: Michael Kurtz kurtzcfa.harvard.edu

My recent paper (Worldwide Use ...) for The Journal of the American  
Society for Information Science and Technology (JASIST) speaks to  
these issues in detail.  It is available on the journal's web site, or  
as a preprint on my home page:  
  http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~kurtz/jasist1-abstract.html  
(there are links to the whole text from the abstract page.  A companion
article  
(also in JASIST)  
  http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~kurtz/jasist2-abstract.html 
may also be of interest. 

Best wishes, 

Michael Kurtz 

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3. Women Who Cite Sex Bias...: article available from AAUW Web site 
From: Dorothy Fraquelli fraquellistsci.edu

[Eds. note: the report, "Who Cite Sex Bias in Tenure Lawsuits Face High 
  Costs and Long Odds", was cited in the October 22, 2004 issue of 
  AASWOMEN.] 

The report referenced below is available from the AAUW website.  Go to 
http://www.aauw.org.  The report appears to be based on cases supported 
by AAUW's Legal Advocacy Fund, which provides legal and financial support 
to women having non-athletic Title IX problems with their
University/College 
employers (i.e., mostly tenure battles).  After you read the article,
consider 
making a tax-deductible donation to the legal Advocacy Fund. 

                                        Dorothy Fraquelli 
                                        fraquellistsci.edu 

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4. Leaky Pipeline Data 
From WIPHYS for Oct. 25, 2004 

Hello, 
I am trying to find good graphs and charts (data) that describe the  
"leaky pipeline" problem in the different science disciplines and 
math, engineering.  I was quite sure I saw a couple of nice ones this 
year in the Chronicle of Higher Ed., but I can't find the article now.  
If anyone knows of that article, or can tell me the best place to find 
such graphs I'd appreciate it.  The more specific you can be the 
better.  (i.e. I know AIP compiles statistics but where do I find this 
info?)   Thank you,  
Eliz Freeland 
home.earthlink.net/~papagena/ 

***** 
From WIPHYS for Oct. 27, 2004 

AIP does have data on the pipeline for women in physics and 
astronomy.  We have not published these data yet, but will by the 
end of 2004 in a new report funded by the Alfred P. Sloan 
Foundation.  In the meantime, Fran Bagenal has a great article on 
the pipeline in AAS's Status newsletter that has some of our charts, 
although they will be updated for our new report.  Here is the link:  
http://www.aas.org/%7Ecswa/status/STATUS_Jun04sm.pdf  

Rachel Ivie, PhD 
Principal Research Associate 
Statistical Research Center 
American Institute of Physics 
rivieaip.org 

**** 
From WIPHYS for Oct. 27, 2004 

AIP's statistics site has several nice links to reports:  
http://www.aip.org/statistics/  A particularly useful report is  
the Women in Physics, 2000 study  
http://www.aip.org/statistics/trends/reports/wominphys.pdf. 

Also, the NSF's report on Women, Minorities, and Persons with  
Disabilities has all the data you could wish for.  It's not always in  
graph form, but you can easily create graphs by downloading data 
in Excel format.  The whole report for 2004 (most recent) is 
available at http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/wmpd/pdf.htm and 
individual data tables can be downloaded at  
http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/wmpd/start.htm.. 

The Chronicle article may be this one  
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v50/i36/36b01601.htm by Muriel  
Lederman, but I don't have access to read it electronically so I'm  
not sure. 
Laura McCullough 
mcculloughluwstout.edu 

**** 
From WIPHYS for Oct. 27, 2004 
In response to Eliz Freeland about pipeline leakage statistics, I am 
forwarding Dr. Beverly Hartline's recommendations: 

NSF has several reports and databases on its website www.nsf.gov  
related to human resources in science and engineering, and one 
should go here for the first look. Go to the link to science statistics 
along the left side of the web page. Also, AIP has such data for 
physics and PhD production data for some other fields. Other 
professional societies may have done similar studies. 
Eliane  Schnirman Lessner 
Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division 
eslanl.gov 

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5. Chicago Lecture on Ruby Payne-Scott: The First Woman Radio Astronomer 
From: Grace Wolf-Chase gwolfchaseadlernet.org

Friday, November 5, 2004 
7:00pm 
Adler Planetarium 
Chicago, Illinois 

Dr. Miller Goss 
National Radio Astronomy Observatory 
Socorro, New Mexico 

What was it like to be one of the few woman scientists in a man's world 
60 years ago?  Although radio waves from space were first detected in 
1930, until radar technology developed during Word War II was widely 
available, the number of radio astronomers was very small.  In 21st 
century America, it is hard to imagine how difficult it was for the 
first women radio astronomers to carry out research when faced with 
institutional discrimination.  At Adler's Far Out Friday event in 
November, Dr. Miller Goss will trace the important scientific 
contributions of one of the first radio astronomers, Ruby Payne-Scott, 
from her early days as a science teacher in Australia to her career as a 
radio astronomer, including the challenges she met as woman in the 
male-dominated world of post-war science. 

Lecture is included as a part of Adler's Far Out Friday program.  Far 
Out Fridays take place 4:30 to 10:00 pm on the first Friday of each 
month.  For more information, please visit: 
http://www.adlerplanetarium.org/visitors-guide/new.shtml#fof 

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6. NSF Report on Gender and Academic Scientists' Careers 
From: FYI number 142 (http://www.aip.org/fyi/) 

The National Science Foundation has just published a report which 
found evidence "that female scientists and engineers are less 
successful than their male counterparts in traveling along the 
academic career path."    The statistical analysis examined four 
"critical outcomes" in arriving at this conclusion: "tenure-track 
placement, earning tenure, promotion to the rank of associate 
professor, and promotion to the rank of full professor." 

This 173-page report, "Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic 
Scientists and Engineers," was written by the Division of Science 
Resources Statistics of NSF's Directorate for Social, Behavioral, 
and Economic Sciences.  Dated June 2004, the report is available at 
http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsf04323/pdfstart.htm 

Over 100 pages of this report consist of detailed statistical 
tables, obtained from the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, a survey 
made every two years of only those individuals receiving science and 
engineering doctorates in the United States.   The survey includes 
information on the recipient's degree, career outcome, and a range 
of personal characteristics.  By analyzing this data, it was 
possible to "test hypotheses about whether being married or having 
children affects the careers of women and men differently."  Note 
that the analysis was made only of doctorate recipients in academic 
positions. 

Selections from the report's findings follow: 

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS: 

"We find evidence that female scientists and engineers are less 
successful than their male counterparts in traveling along the 
academic career path. Some of this disparity appears to be related 
to differences between the sexes in the influence of family 
characteristics. Typically, married women and women with children 
are less successful than men who are married and have children.  Our 
estimates of gender differences in success rates are relatively 
insensitive to characteristics of academic employers and to primary 
work activity." 

TENURE-TRACK PLACEMENT: 

"After accounting for controls, women with eight or nine years of 
postdoctoral experience who are employed full-time in academia are 
about 3.3 percentage points less likely than men to be employed in 
tenure-track positions.  The comparable estimate for women with 14 
or 15 years of experience is about 4.5 percentage points. If we 
allow for gender differences in the influence of family 
characteristics, gender differences in tenure-track placements are 
statistically insignificant. Our estimates suggest that being 
married or having children reduces women's chances to be employed in 
tenure-track positions relative to men who are married or have 
children." 

TENURE: 

"After accounting for controls, women with eight or nine years of 
postdoctoral experience who are employed full time in academia are 
about 6.9 percentage points less likely than men to be tenured. The 
comparable estimate for women with 14 or 15 years of experience is 
about 8.5 percentage points. When we restrict our analysis to 
tenure-track positions only, women with eight or nine years of 
postdoctoral experience are about 5.9 percentage points less likely 
than men to be tenured. The comparable estimate for women with 14 or 
15 years of experience is about 4.1 percentage points. 

"Our analysis suggests that women's chances for earning tenure are 
related to the influence of family characteristics.  In most of the 
models we estimated, gender differences in tenure rates are 
statistically insignificant when we allow for gender differences in 
the influence of family characteristics. Having young children later 
in their careers is positively related to women's chances for 
earning tenure. We interpret this as indirect evidence suggesting 
that women who do not have children early in their careers increase 
their chances for earning tenure." 

ACADEMIC RANK: 

"Our Phase I analysis examined the likelihood that individuals will 
be employed in any one of three different academic ranks - junior 
ranks, rank of associate professor, and rank of full professor - at 
specific points in their postdoctoral careers.  We found that, after 
accounting for controls, women with 14 or 15 years of postdoctoral 
experience who are employed full-time in academia are about 8 
percentage points more likely than men to be employed in junior 
ranks.  The estimate for women with 20 or 21 years of postdoctoral 
experience is similar. After accounting for controls, women with 14 
or 15 years of postdoctoral experience who are employed full-time in 
academia are almost 14 percentage points less likely than men to be 
employed at the rank of full professor. The comparable estimate for 
women with 20 or 21 years of postdoctoral experience is similar. Our 
analysis suggests some of the gender differences in academic rank 
are related to differential influences of family characteristics. 
For example, if we allow for gender differences in the influence of 
family variables, the relative difference in employment at the 
full-professor rank for full-time academicians with 20 or 21 years 
of postdoctoral experience falls to about 7 percentage points, but 
it remains statistically significant.  Gender differences in 
academic rank decline if we exclude from our samples doctorate 
recipients who reported employment in nontenure-track positions. 
This finding is consistent with our Phase I tenure analysis, which 
shows that women are more likely than men to be employed in these 
positions. 

"The Phase II rank analysis estimated differences between women and 
men in the likelihood of doctorate recipients holding either the 
associate- or full-professor rank at any given time in their 
postdoctoral careers. Most of our Phase II findings are consistent 
with the results of our Phase I rank analysis. The Phase II rank 
analysis indicates that, after accounting for controls, women are 
less likely than men to be promoted to senior ranks. We also find 
that after allowing for gender differences in the influence of 
family characteristics, gender differences in promotions to the 
full-professor rank are statistically insignificant.  We are 
concerned, however, that the data we used in our Phase II analysis 
overstate the relative amount of time it takes men to earn 
promotions, causing us to understate gender differences in promotion 
rates in the Phase II analyses." 

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7. Postdoctoral position at Indiana University, Bloomington 
From: Liese Van Zee vanzeeastro.indiana.edu

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral position in the Department of 
Astronomy at Indiana University, Bloomington.  Indiana University is a 
founding member of the WIYN consortium, and has a 17% share of the WIYN
0.9m and WIYN 3.5m telescopes on Kitt Peak.  The postdoctoral researcher will
work with Dr. Liese van Zee on the SMUDGES survey (see 
  http://www.astro.indiana.edu/~vanzee/research/research2.html 
for more details).  The ideal candidate will have interests in the
formation 
and evolution of nearby galaxies and have experience with optical imaging 
and analysis. 

The position is for two years, with a possible third year extension
subject to the availability of funding and performance.  The position is available

starting August 15, 2005, but the actual start date is negotiable.
Qualified applicants must have a PhD or equivalent degree by the date of
appointment. 

Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a
summary of research interests, and names and e-mail address of three references. 
All inquiries and applications should be sent to Dr. van Zee, Dept. of 
Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 E 3rd St, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105,
USA. Applications received by January 31, 2005 will receive full consideration.

Indiana University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. 
Applications from women and minorities are particularly encouraged. 

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8. Postdoctoral Positions with the Submillimeter Array, Smithsonian Astro.
Obs. 
From: David Wilner dwilnercfa.harvard.edu

The Submillimeter Array (SMA) is an exploratory instrument sited near  the

4000 meter summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, designed for interferometry at 
frequencies from 180 GHz to 900 GHz. The SMA consists of eight 6-meter 
antennas configurable in several arrangements to achieve subarcsecond 
resolution. The SMA was formally dedicated in November, 2003, and all 
eight antennas are now in routine use. The SMA is a collaborative  project
of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academia Sinica
Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Taiwan). More information can be found at 
  http://sma1.sma.harvard.edu/. 

Pending funding, the SMA project will have several postdoctoral positions 
available aimed at research in support of development and operation of the
array. SMA postdoctoral fellows participate in science observations with
the SMA and help enable new SMA capabilities. In addition, they may pursue 
instrumentation, observational studies, or theoretical work related to 
submillimeter wavelength astronomy and/or interferometry. Examples of
areas of interest include receivers and electronics, calibration techniques, 
algorithms for aperture synthesis, and theoretical modeling. 

It is expected that most of these positions will be based in Hilo, HI, at 
the new SMA building at the University of Hawaii, Hilo, University Park, 
near to the offices of many of the other Mauna Kea observatories. 
Applicants should have a Ph.D. in astronomy or a related field and
practical experience in submillimeter wavelength astronomy, radio interferometry, 
instrumentation, or any applicable branch of astrophysical theory. 
The positions are for two years, renewable for a third year. Applicants 
should provide a curriculum vita, statement of research interest, and
arrange for three letters of recommendation to be sent to the above address by 
31 December 2004 for full consideration. Questions should be directed to
the SMA Project Scientist, Dr. Paul T.P. Ho, at (617) 495-7088. 

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9. Tenure-Track Position at Arizona State University 
From: Sumner Starrfield starrfiesusie.la.asu.edu

Faculty Position in Stellar Theory or Observational Extragalactic
Astronomy 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Arizona State University  seeks
to fill a tenure-track faculty position in stellar theory or observational 
extragalactic astronomy. The appointment will be at the assistant or
associate professor level, with a preferred starting date of August 16, 2005.
Candidates in stellar theory should be experts in computational astrophysics as
applied to stellar problems. Candidates in observational extragalactic astronomy are 
preferred with a focus on infrared astronomy, with a view towards the
Spitzer Space Telescope, the planned NASA James Webb Space Telescope and other
future facilities. 

The successful candidate will be expected to lead an active research
program, as well as develop interdisciplinary ties within the new School of Earth
and Space Exploration (SESE) now being formed at ASU, which will include
astronomy and astrophysics, the geological sciences, parts of engineering and other 
fields to be determined. The candidate must have a doctorate in astronomy
or related field by the time of the appointment, and teaching experience,
research and professional service appropriate to rank. Teaching in our extensive 
undergraduate and graduate programs is an important component of the   
evaluation of faculty. 

The ASU Department of Physics and Astronomy consists of forty full-time 
faculty with research interests in a wide variety of fields. The
successful applicant will have access to the observatories in Arizona, 
including the MMT, Magellan, the LBT (2004), and other facilities operated 
by Steward Observatory. 
ASU also has a strong tradition of participation in NASA missions. 

The initial closing date is January 17, 2005; if not filled, every two
weeks thereafter until search is closed. A complete application consists of 
a letter of application describing research and teaching experience and 
interests, a CV, and three letters of reference. Please arrange to have 
letters sent directly to ASU, and include the names of references in the 
application. Materials must be sent to Ms. Lynne Kincaid, Search Coordinator, 
Arizona State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 871504, 
Tempe, AZ  85287-1504.

Both application materials and reference letters are preferred (as PDF
files) via email to astronomy.searchasu.edu. 
AA/EOE . 

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10. Deputy Director of the NRAO 
From: Tavia Dillon tdillonnrao.edu

The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) invites nominations and 
applications for the position of Deputy Director in Charlottesville, 
Virginia.  The Deputy Director is ideally a distinguished astronomer 
serving as the Chief Science Operations Officer for the Observatory. 
This position reports to the NRAO Director and together with the 
Associate Director for Administration oversees all internal Observatory 
operations. 

The individual selected will be responsible for the overall management 
of the following science operations areas, overseeing the heads of the 
following branches of the NRAO: Green Bank Operations (Green Bank 
Telescope), New Mexico Operations (Very Large Array, Very Long Baseline 
Array), Division of Science and Academic Affairs, Data Management, 
Technology Research and Development, and Spectrum Management. 

The Deputy Director will also assist the Director in the development of 
the annual operating budget, the annual Program Plan and the Long Range 
Plan; and will assist the Director with oral presentations to the 
National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Associated Universities, Inc 
(AUI). 

This position requires a Ph.D. or equivalent in Astronomy, Physics, or 
related fields, and a distinguished scientific research record of 
sufficient breadth and accomplishment to merit appointment as a tenured 
NRAO scientific staff, and excellent interpersonal, communication, and 
organization skills.  Prior administrative experience is desirable, 
especially at a major astronomy or physics research organization (such 
as a Federally Funded Research and Development organization). 

Candidates interested in applying for this position, should forward a 
cover letter and resume with the names of 5 individuals who can serve as 
references to: National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Human Resources 
Manager, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 or email: 
resumesnrao.edu . 

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11. Research Associate in Computational Astrophysics/Code Validation,
U-Chicago 
From WIPHYS for Oct. 25, 2004 

The DOE-funded ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear 
Flashes at the University of Chicago, the FLASH Center, invites
applications 
for a postdoctoral research position in computational physics/code
validation. 

The Center's purpose is to develop and apply a general-purpose
multi-physics 
adaptive mesh refinement code, FLASH.  The primary applications of the
FLASH 
code are modeling of astrophysical thermonuclear explosions with emphasis
on 
Type Ia supernovae and laboratory experiments for code validation.  The 
Center's vigorous scientific program involves frequent interactions 
with theorists and experimentalists from the National Laboratories, 
and collaborations with leading academic centers in the US and 
Europe. Complete details on the position can be read at 
  http://flash.uchicago.edu/website/jobs/#ca_va  
More information about the ASC FLASH Center and the Computational Physics 
and Validation Group can be found at: 
  http://flash.uchicago.edu and  
  http://flash.uchicago.edu/compphys/  

The position is for a period of two years with the possibility of 
renewal. The position is for immediate employment. To apply, 
please submit to the above address a curriculum vitae, a list of 
publications, a brief description of research interests, and the 
names and contact information for three references. Please refer to 
"Position in Code Validation" when applying.  Applications will be 
accepted until the position is filled. The University of Chicago is an 
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.  Email 
Submission Address: Carrie Eder, Center Administrator at  
ederflash.uchicago.edu Email Inquiries: ederflash.uchicago.edu  

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12. Tenure-Track Position at SUNY/Geneseo 
From WIPHYS for Oct. 29, 2004 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY/Geneseo invites
applications 
for a tenure track position at the Assistant Professor level in astronomy,

starting in Fall 2005.  The primary teaching responsibility involves
teaching 
the astronomy course (lecture and lab) that is offered for over 125
non-majors 
every semester.  Other teaching responsibilities include introductory
physics 
labs and upper level physics and astrophysics lectures.  Applicants should

also have a demonstrated potential for excellence in undergraduate
teaching 
and a strong commitment to actively involving undergraduates in research.

Preference will be given to candidates with a strong background in 
observational astronomy.  The successful candidate will be responsible for
the 
astronomy facilities that include undergraduate labs, a planetarium,
several 
optical telescopes and a 3-meter radio telescope.  Other department
facilities 
include a 2MV Van de Graaff accelerator, a Thin Film Deposition Laboratory
and 
a machine shop.  Candidates must have completed all Ph.D. requirements in 
astronomy or astrophysics before August 20, 2005.  

For more information about the College and the Department, consult our web

site at  
  http://www.geneseo.edu/~physics>http://www.geneseo.edu/~physics 

Applicants should send a resume, cover letter, three letters of reference 
and a summary of research interests via an online application process at 
  http://jobs.geneseo.edu/>http://jobs.geneseo.edu 
The deadline for application is December 31, 2004.  SUNY Geneseo is an 
affirmative action/equal opportunity employer committed to recruiting, 
supporting, and fostering a diverse community of outstanding faculty,
staff, 
and students. 

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