AAS Committee on the Status of Women 
Issue of August 17, 2007 
eds. Joan Schmelz, Geoffrey Clayton, & Hannah Jang-Condell 
This week's issues: 
 
1. New Advice for an Old Problem? 
2. Nature Amends its Mission Statement 
3. Female Friendly Physics Graduate Programs 
4. Fellowships Focus on Gender/Women in STEM Fields 
5. Assistant to the Director/Astronomer at Swinburne University 
6. How to submit, subscribe, or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN 
 
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1. New Advice for an Old Problem? 
From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelzmemphis.edu] 
 
AASWOMEN would like your help in putting together some advice for those 
with a 2-body problem. For example, if you are interviewing for a job, 
when is the right time to bring up the 2-body subject? Are there 
employers out there that are doing an especially good job of 
accommodating those with a 2-body problem? 
 
Traditionally, the only solution was to work in a city with a lot of 
astronomy positions, e.g., Washington or Boston, and hope for the best. 
What are the modern-day solutions? Are there ideas that work in general 
or is every situation different? 
 
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2. Nature Amends its Mission Statement 
From: Hannah Jang-Condell [hannahalum.mit.edu] 
 
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v448/n7155/full/448728a.html 
 
In an editorial in yesterday's Nature (see above link), the magazine 
announced that it would change the wording of its original mission 
statement, which included the phrase, 
 
"to aid Scientific men themselves, by giving early information of all 
advances made in any branch of Natural knowledge throughout the world, 
and by affording them an opportunity of discussing the various 
Scientific questions which arise from time to time." 
 
The big change, apparently, is to insert the word 'sic', as follows: 
 
"to aid Scientific men [sic] themselves, ..." 
 
A giant leap forward, or a big ol' cop out? 
 
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3. Female Friendly Physics Graduate Programs 
From: WIPHYS August 15, 2007 
 
[This item is copied directly from WIPHYS, but an editorial comment 
seems appropriate. Shouldn't a Physics Department advertising on a 
"female friendly" web site have to do more than simply fill out a form? 
-- Eds.] 
 
Thinking about graduate school? Check out the "female friendly" website 
at 
 
http://www.aps.org/programs/women/female-friendly/index.cfm.=20 
 
This data base contains information that can be used by undergraduate 
seniors to assess the climate for women at various graduate schools. The 
American Physical Society's Committee on the Status of Women in Physics 
asked PhD-granting physics departments to complete a brief form in 
response to five questions. All information is completely self-reported 
by the departments themselves. Neither CSWP nor the APS is responsible 
for its accuracy or timeliness. Please check back regularly as the 
information is updated all the time and new institutions may have been 
added!=20 
 
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4. Fellowships Focus on Gender/Women in STEM Fields 
From: WIPHYS August 13, 2007 
 
The Clayman Institute is currently focusing on gender/women in the STEM 
fields. We have a particular interest in "gendered innovations" - that 
is, where the introduction of gender analysis into science and 
engineering can change the nature of knowledge itself, for example by 
challenging existing preconceptions, encouraging new ways to look at old 
problems, or even changing or creating fields of research. 
 
Applications are sought from scholars working in the following areas of 
research: 
 
Gendered Innovations in Knowledge. While much has been written on women 
in science and engineering, especially the difficulty of recruiting and 
retaining women in these areas, the challenge now is to integrate the 
insights of gender studies into scientific theory and practice. We 
welcome research proposals that address how gender analysis, when turned 
to science and engineering, can profoundly enhance human knowledge. This 
is where the action is today. The key questions are: How has gender 
analysis sparked creativity by opening new questions for future 
research? How can employing gender as a tool of analysis lead to new 
knowledge? To better understand what we are looking for, see Londa 
Schiebinger, Has Feminism Changed Science? (Harvard University Press, 
1999), part III, or Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 28 
(2003):859-922 on "Feminism Inside the Sciences." 
 
Title IX in Science and Engineering. Title IX applies to all areas of 
federally-funded education, including science and engineering. 
Researchers working on the use of Title IX, in particular identifying 
criteria for assessing institutional compliance with Title IX, in the 
sciences are invited to apply. 
 
Gender in the Physical and Technical Sciences, and Math. Any project 
addressing questions concerning gender in physics, chemistry, math, 
geosciences or computer science. 
 
Gender in Engineering and Computer science. 
Gender in Environmental Sciences. 
Gender in the Life Sciences and Biotechnology. 
Medicine and Women's Health. 
 
Clustering in Scientific Subfields. Women tend to cluster in particular 
sciences, such as the life sciences, and in particular subfields of 
science or engineering (for example, there are many more women in civil 
than in electrical engineering). They welcome applications that 
investigate what it is about particular fields that attract or repel 
women. 
 
If you have any questions, their Program Manager, Jane Gruba-Chevalier, 
would be happy to help. She can be contacted at jmgrubastanford.edu. 
 
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5. Assistant to the Director/Astronomer at Swinburne University 
From: Sarah Maddison [smaddisonswin.edu.au] 
 
The Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing at Swinburne University 
of Technology has become one of the largest astronomy groups in 
Australia and is seeking to further expand its research infrastructure, 
supercomputing and research outputs. This position will report to the 
Director and assist the Director to facilitate grant administration and 
reporting, while remaining engaged in teaching and research/outreach. 
The primary role of the Director's Assistant position is to help in 
attracting and reporting on external grants and research, in particular 
the forthcoming RQF exercise. The main teaching responsibilities will be 
to assist in the maintenance of existing Swinburne Astronomy Online 
(SAO) course material, help in the preparation of new course material 
for the BSc, and teach into one or both of these programs. The 
successful applicant will work closely with the Academic Leader to 
ensure the continued success of the SAO program and ensure high quality 
learning materials are developed for the BSc program. Opportunities 
exist for pursuit of research and outreach activities. This position is 
ongoing. Applications close August31 and should be emailed to the 
Director: mbailesswin.edu.au 
 
For a full Position Description see:=20 
 
http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/jobs/ 
 
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6. How to submit, subscribe, or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN 
 
[Please remember to replace "" in the below e-mail addresses.] 
 
To submit to AASWOMEN: 
  send email to aaswomen.aas.org=20 
All material sent to that address will be posted unless you tell us 
otherwise (including your email address). 
 
To subscribe or unsubscribe to AASWOMEN 
  go to http://lists.aas.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/aaswomen 
and fill out the form.=20 
 
If you experience any problems, please email itdeptaas.org 
 
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