AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of December 2, 2011
eds. Joan Schmelz, Caroline Simpson & Michele Montgomery

This week's issues:

1.  Why Aren't Prizes Gender Balanced?

2.  Gender Balance Among Tenured Astronomers?

3.  Percentage of Women Colloquium Speakers: Information Needed

4.  Astronomical Bullying

5.  Responses to 'Women as Planetary Science Role Models'

6.  Working Women Still Struggling

7.  CSWP Woman Physicist of the Month Nominations

8.  Wanted:  Students to Write on Women in Science for Scientista Foundation

9.  Childcare Options at 219th AAS Meeting - Austin, TX

10.  How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

11.  How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

12.  Access to Past Issues

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1.  Why Aren't Prizes Gender Balanced?
From:  Hannah Jang-Condell Hannah_at_women_in_astronomy_blog

[Hannah discusses the gender balance of invited speakers and prize  
recipients at the upcoming AAS January Meeting in Austin. -- eds.]

The CSWA has been making an effort to keep track of the percentages of  
women speakers at conferences.  Recently, we featured a conference  
with a very high percentage of women speakers, right here on this  
blog. It's great to see that we are making progress. So, when I  
received the November 14th mailing from the AAS about the upcoming  
January meeting in Austin, I couldn't help but read the following  
enthusiastic description about the invited speakers with some amount  
of dismay:

To read more, please see:

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/

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2.  Gender Balance Among Tenured Astronomers?
From:  Joan Schmelz [Jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

CSWA began compiling a list of the percentage of women among the  
tenured faculty members of Ph.D. astronomy departments in the US. This  
list has now been expanded to include the percentage of women  
researchers/faculty/staff with tenure or the equivalent for US  
astronomy institutes/universities/observatories. Numbers and  
percentages were confirmed by a member of each organization.

For the rankings, please see

http://www.aas.org/cswa/percent_tenured.html

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3.  Percentage of Women Colloquium Speakers: Information Needed
From:  Nancy Morrison, NMorris_at_UTNet.UToledo.Edu

In keeping with the CSWA's project to disseminate statistics on the  
status of women in astronomy, we are beginning to gather information  
on the number of women speakers in astronomy colloquium series.  
Therefore, we would welcome submissions of numbers of speakers in your  
department, by academic term. If your organization has a joint physics  
and astronomy colloquium series - or some other combination of  
disciplines - please categorize the male and female speakers by  
discipline. Numbers for the current academic term (quarter or  
semester) or previous terms are welcome.

Please send the information to the CSWA Webmaster, Nancy Morrison,  
NMorris_at_UTNet.UToledo.Edu . Your help will be warmly appreciated.

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4.  Astronomical Bullying
From:  Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

The CSWA will host a Town Hall on the topic of astronomical bullying  
at the 220th AAS meeting to be held in Anchorage, Alaska.  The Town  
Hall meeting entitled "CSWA: Introduction to Astronomical Bullying" is  
scheduled for Monday, 11 June 2012, 12:45 PM to 1:45 PM.

New information including this subject can be found at our webpage,  
under 'What's New'

http://www.aas.org/cswa/

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5.  Responses to 'Women as Planetary Science Role Models'
From:  Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

Have you ever wanted to be a fly on the wall and listen to men and  
women openly discuss the role of women in science?  Seventy comments  
have been posted since April 29, 2011 to Discover Magazine's Bad  
Astronomy blog on 'Women as Planetary Science Role Models.'

For example,

Patrick says, "Not that many people in general are interested in  
either science or engineering these days.  I'll guess it's the  
'Science is Hard' issue. The same issues seem to apply to both males  
and females these days (based on some younger friends I have).  
Students head off to business schools, law, or humanities because  
they're easier and you still get a diploma."

Radwaste says, "Let's be real skeptics here and get a definition  
applied.  What is not needed is 'gender equity' as 'the same number of  
female astronomers as men.' What is needed is 'equity' as opportunity  
not based on 'gender.' In many professions, this distinction is not  
clear. In my particular location, it meant the hiring of incompetent  
people to meet a quota. This makes output worse than if they were not  
hired.  What is needed is the abolition of discrimination NOT BASED ON  
PERFORMANCE.  If you can't do what Phil [Plait, creator of Bad Astronomy]
did to get his PhD, then you probably shouldn't have one.  
If you can, then I cheer wildly at your achievements, take a bow!  I'm  
sure that's what Phil had in mind. I just wanted to make sure it's  
clear."

Helen says "Some of these comments are so alienating. I'm a woman and  
I read the blog, I like science, and I don't believe in astrology."

To read more on the informing blog and the various takes on the blog,  
please see

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/04/29/
women-as-planetary-science-role-models/

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6. Working Women Still Struggling
From:  John Leibacher [leib@email.tuc.noao.edu]

SINCE 1970 the proportion of women in the workforce across the rich  
world has increased from 48% to 64%, a sharp rise but one which  
nevertheless leaves women in rich countries underemployed compared  
with women in China. There are large variations from country to  
country, but the broad trend in most places is still slightly upwards.  
Yet while women have made big strides in all kinds of careers they  
find it harder than men to bag the most senior jobs. Just 3% of  
Fortune 500 CEOs are women. And despite sheaves of equal-pay  
legislation, women still get paid less than men for comparable work.  
This week's special report explores the reasons why progress seems to  
have stalled and what can be done about it.

To read more, please see the blog

http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/11/working-women?fsrc=nlw|newe
|11-25-2011|new_on_the_economist

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7.  CSWP Woman Physicist of the Month Nominations
From: WIPHYS, November 30, 2011

Do you know an outstanding female in physics who deserves  
recognition? Nominate her for the CSWP Woman Physicist of the Month!  
Features start in January 2012:

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/womanofthemonth.cfm

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8.  Wanted:  Students to Write on Women in Science for Scientista Foundation
From:  WIPHYS, November 30, 2011

Apply to be a writer for the Scientista Foundation's online magazine!  
They are seeking talented writers from across universities. For more  
information, visit this website:

http://www.scientistafoundation.com/12/post/2011/10/
join-wise-words-writing-national-and-school-branch.html

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9. Childcare Options at 219th AAS Meeting - Austin, TX
From:  Joan Schmelz [Jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

The AAS will provide childcare onsite during the meeting through the  
Kiddie Corps Service. Care will be available Sunday, 8 January 2012  
through Thursday, 12 January 2012. The cost of care is per $8 hour.  
The advance registration deadline is 12 December 2011. To arrange  
childcare please complete the registration form

http://www.kiddiecorp.com/aaskids.htm

Childcare grants are available for up to $250 per family for those  
that wish to bring children to the meeting. Parents are responsible  
for making arrangements for childcare. To apply for a childcare grant  
please fill out the Childcare Grant Application

http://aas.org/meetings/childcaregrants.php

If requests exceed available funding, preference will be given to  
those in the early stages of their careers. If you have questions  
about childcare please contact Debbie Kovalsky at 202-328-2010 ext. 110.

Childcare Sharing
Please visit the Childcare Sharing Forum

http://forums.aas.org/viewforum.php?f=10

to find other attendees interested in sharing childcare. You will need  
to register to view and post on the forum.

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10. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to  
topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including  
your email address.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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11.  How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

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If you experience any problems, please email itdept_at_aas.org

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12.  Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.








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