AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy
Issue of March 1, 2013
eds. Caroline Simpson, Michele Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, & Nick Murphy

This week's issues:

1. March is Women's History Month

2. The Ph.D. Bust: America's Awful Market for Young Scientists

3. "Why So Few?" a short presentation about the 2010 AAUW report

4. Taking time to think about expectations for women in undergraduate science

5. What does it mean to be smart?

6. Men and Women, Like Totally, Talk Differently?

7. Women in science: challenges and opportunities

8. The Spring 2013 Gazette is available online

9. The 2013 Blewett Fellowship

10. Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

11. 2013 Rocks!

12. Job Opportunities

13. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

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1. March is Women's History Month
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_northwestern.edu]

The 2013 National Women's History Month theme is:

Women Inspiring Innovation Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

This theme honors generations of women who throughout American history have used
their intelligence, imagination, sense of wonder, and tenacity to make
extraordinary contributions to the STEM fields.

To learn more about activities associated with Women's History Month, please see

http://www.nwhp.org/

and/or

http://womenshistorymonth.gov/

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2. The Ph.D. Bust: America's Awful Market for Young Scientists
From: Teresa Ross [rosst_at_nmsu.edu]

Although this article is not exclusively about women or astronomers, it does
encompass us as scientists. I think readers of the AASWomen Newsletter will find
it interesting, if not somewhat bleak.

** The Ph.D Bust: America's Awful Market for Young Scientists—in 7 Charts

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/02/the-phd-bust-americas-awful-
market-for-young-scientists-in-7-charts/273339/

[And here's an expansion specific to US-born scientists. -Eds]

** The Ph.D. Bust, Pt. II: How Bad Is the Job Market For Young American-Born
Scientists?

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/02/the-phd-bust-pt-ii-how-bad-
is-the-job-market-for-young-american-born-scientists/273377/

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3. "Why So Few?" a short presentation about the 2010 AAUW report
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]

This 25-minute PowerPoint presentation makes it easy to present the findings
from AAUW's 2010 research report, Why So Few? Women in Science, Technology,
Engineering, and Mathematics. The presentation includes recent findings that
point to environmental and social barriers - including stereotypes, gender bias,
and the climate of science and engineering departments in colleges and
universities - that continue to block women's participation and progress in STEM
fields.

The PowerPoint presentation is available here

http://www.aauw.org/resource/why-so-few-women-in-science-technology-engineering-
and-mathematics-owerpoint-presentation-short/

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4. Taking time to think about expectations for women in undergraduate science
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]

[This was very interesting! I like the concept of the 'implied student.' It
helps put focus on how to identify otherwise subtle clues and address them.
-Eds.]

The article by Marie-Claire Shanahan is published in Inside Higher Ed and opens:

Decades of research in higher education has sought to understand why students
come to STEM fields and why they leave. This has been especially true for women
in science degree programs. ... Decades later, there are still significant gaps
in women's participation and persistence, especially in physics and
physics-related engineering disciplines such as mechanical and electrical,
despite efforts to overcome preparation deficits, provide role models and
mentoring, and build communities for women in sciences.

To read more, please see

http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/university-venus/taking-time-think-about-
expectations-women-undergraduate-science

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5. What does it mean to be smart?
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Today's guest blogger is Nicholas McConnell. Nicholas earned his PhD in 2012
and is now the Beatrice Watson Parrent Fellow at the Institute for Astronomy
(University of Hawaii). His research focuses on supermassive black holes and
giant elliptical galaxies.]

High intelligence is a common stereotype about astronomers and physicists.
Indeed, many of us have performed well throughout school and on standardized
tests. But in graduate school problem sets are replaced by open-ended research
questions, and steady affirmation gives way to occasional, even frequent,
frustration. Yet our colleagues seem brilliant and productive. For many people,
research provides fertile ground for self-doubt. "Am I as smart as I thought I
was?  Do I have what it takes?"

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/02/what-does-it-mean-to-be-smart.html

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6. Men and Women, Like Totally, Talk Differently?
From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

About a year ago, while preparing to go on the post-doc job talk circuit, I was
practicing in front of my research group at Berkeley.  A post-doc pulled me
aside after my talk and pointed out to me that I have a particular vocal tic.  A
tic, she said, that tends to be more prevalent in young women called "uptalk."

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/02/uptalk.html


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7. Women in science: challenges and opportunities
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_northwestern.edu]

[This video features a roundtable discussion at McGill University in Montreal
with four prominent women scientists, including astrophysicist Victoria Kaspi.
-Eds]

Brenda Milner, Victoria Kaspi, Rima Rozen, and Jane Stewart share their
experiences and discuss the challenges faced by women embracing careers in
science.

To watch the video, please visit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VevFeWPSVEE

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8. The Spring 2013 Gazette is available online
From: WIPHYS, February 27, 2013

The Gazette is the newsletter of the APS Committee on the Status of Women in
Physics (CSWP) and the Committee on Minorities (COM). Items featured in the
Gazette include updates on CSWP and COM activities and programs, book reviews,
statistical reports, and articles on programs designed to increase the
participation of women and minorities in science.

This Spring's Gazette has several astro-related items, including:

	* Feryal Ozel is the 2013 Maria Goeppert Mayer Awardee
	* Advancing Astronomy in Africa

Download the PDF here

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/reports/gazette/upload/spring13.pdf

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9. The 2013 Blewett Fellowship
From: WIPHYS, February 27, 2013

The APS is now accepting applications for the 2013 Blewett Fellowship, which
enables women to return to physics research careers after having had to
interrupt those careers. Applications are due June 1, 2013.

To learn more and apply visit

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/blewett/index.cfm

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10. Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching
From: WIPHYS, February 27, 2013

PAEMST are the nation's highest honors for teachers of mathematics and science
(including computer science). Awardees serve as models for their colleagues,
inspiration to their communities, and leaders in the improvement of mathematics
and science education. Since 1983, more than 4,200 teachers have been recognized
for their contributions in the classroom and to their profession. If you know
great teachers, nominate them by April 1 to join this prestigious network of
professionals.

Learn more here

https://www.paemst.org/

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11. 2013 Rocks!
From: NRAO announcements [nrao-announcements_at_nrao.edu]

Dear Colleagues,

The NRAO North American ALMA Science Center is holding its 7th annual workshop
8-12 April 2013 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village, on The Big Island of Hawaii,
entitled "Transformational Science with ALMA: From Dust to Rocks to Planets:
Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems". For additional information on the
workshop please visit:

http://www.cv.nrao.edu/rocks/

This is a reminder that the early registration deadline for the 2013 Rocks!
workshop is this Friday, 1 March. After that date, an additional fee of $50 will
be added to all registrations. Registration will formally close on 15 March.
Student participation is highly encouraged, but there are now very few student
subsidies still available so send in your student support request forms as soon
as possible.

The final scientific program is posted at

http://www.cv.nrao.edu/rocks/program.html

Spots are filling up quickly so please register NOW!

As always, if there are any issues or questions, please contact the LOC at
2013rocks@nrao.edu.

Sincerely,
Anthony Remijan (on behalf of the LOC/SOC)
2013rocks@nrao.edu

2013 Rocks! is committed to broadening participation by women and under
represented minorities, as we prepare for the exciting adventures ahead in the
new era!

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12. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their
organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

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13. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send
email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email
address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a
one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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14. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

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15. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.