AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 19, 2013
eds. Caroline Simpson, Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, & Nick Murphy

This week's issues:

1. Invitation to Work with CSWA

2. Career Profiles: Astronomer to Video Game Programmer

3. First Woman Astronomer Hypatia: Paying Dearly for Her Beliefs

4. ADVICE: Advisors, How Do You Deal with Student Tears?

5. Study Finds Gender Bias in the Perception of the Value of Scientific Papers

6. Women and the Economics of Equality

7. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

9. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

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1. Invitation to Work with CSWA
From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

The CSWA strives to create a climate of equal opportunity in hiring, promotion,
salary, and in access to research opportunities and infrastructure at all levels
within the field of astronomy ranging from undergraduate and graduate programs
and then throughout a career in teaching, research, and/or other
astronomy-related fields.

We invite you to work with us as:

-A guest blogger at our Women In Astronomy Blogspot;

-An associate editor for STATUS, our semi-annual magazine;

-A new editor for AASWOMEN, our weekly e-mail newsletter.

If you are interested in joining us as we continue to improve the status of
women in astronomy, please e-mail me at the above address.

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2. Career Profiles: Astronomer to Video Game Programmer
From: Laura Trouille via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

The AAS Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy and the AAS Employment
Committee have compiled dozens of interviews highlighting the diversity of
career trajectories available to astronomers. The interviews share advice and
lessons learned from individuals on those paths.

Below is our interview with Amy Nelson, an astronomer turned software engineer.
She writes software for Disney's online virtual worlds, manages a small team,
and is very satisfied with her work-life balance within a family-friendly
environment.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/04/career-profiles-astronomer-to-video.html

For access to all our Career Profile Project interviews, please visit

http://aas.org/jobs/career-profiles.

We plan to post a new career profile to this blog every first and third Thursday
of the month.

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3. First Woman Astronomer Hypatia: Paying Dearly for Her Beliefs
From: Neil Gehrels via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

There is a growing interest in the history of astronomy, and I caught the bug.
This week we will go back to 4th century Egypt to consider Hypatia, often called
the first female astronomer.  She came to a tragic end due, in large part, to
her influence as a scholar, but first let's hear about her life and
accomplishments.

Hypatia lived in an enlightened era of Egyptian history when reason and
philosophy were highly respected.  Her father, Theon, was a mathematician,
astronomer and philosopher.  He was director of the Museum of Alexandria and
widely respected.  Hypatia was born in about 370 AD. She was well brought up and
sent to Athens for schooling.  There she was educated in the philosophies of
Plato and Plotinus.  She returned to Egypt and became head of the Platonist
school of Alexandria.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/04/first-woman-astronomer-hypatia-paying.html

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4. ADVICE: Advisors, How Do You Deal with Student Tears?
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This is the second in our new series of ADVICE posts as CSWA tries to ensure
that information gathered over the years remains available to the current
generation of students, postdocs, and faculty. This month, we ask, "What should
an advisor do when a student comes into her/his office and breaks into tears?"

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/04/advice-advisors-how-do-you-deal-with.html

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5. Study Finds Gender Bias in the Perception of the Value of Scientific Papers
From: Nancy Morrison [NMorris_at_UTNet.UToledo.Edu]

Today in WIA Report:

'A new study by lead author Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick, a professor of
communication at Ohio State University, finds that the gender of the author of
scientific papers can have an impact on how the research is received. Young
graduate students were given abstracts of research papers and were asked to
assess the work. The names of the authors were fictitious and were obviously
male or female. The author names were not prominently displayed. Some
participants were given a paper with male authors while other participants were
given the same paper with women authors. In most cases, the papers with male
authors were rated higher than those with female authors. Papers by woman
authors on topics such as parenting, children, and body image were rated higher
but on other most other topics, papers by male authors were rated higher.'

It would be interesting to learn whether more experienced readers of scientific
papers, such as Ph.D. holders, would exhibit the same bias, or whether their
presumably more highly trained scientific judgements would prevail.

To read more and see a link to the publication (which may require institutional
login):

http://www.wiareport.com/2013/04/study-finds-gender-bias-in-the-
perception-of-the-value-of-scientific-papers/

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6. Women and the Economics of Equality
From: Kevin Marvel [kevin.marvel_at_aas.org]

In the April 2003 issue of the Harvard Business Review on page 30 is a data
graphic showing economic success of women vs. the support for women for the
countries of the world.  Each country is indicated along with its per capita
GDP. It is an interesting graphic to review.  The Nordic countries and
forward-thinking European countries are clustered in the top right (showing both
excellent support for women and high economic success) along with Canada and
Australia, while the bottom left of the diagram is clustered with countries
imposing strictures on women's progress. Interestingly, if the US, Japan and
Egypt employed women at the same rates as men, their GDP's would be higher by
5%, 9% and 34% respectively.

http://hbr.org/2013/04/women-and-the-economics-of-equality/

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7. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send
email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email
address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a
one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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8. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have
subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back
to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have
UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist/

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using
https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

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9. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.