AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of April 26, 2013
eds. Caroline Simpson, Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, & Nick Murphy

This week's issues:

1. What Can I Do?

2. APS CSWP Climate for Women in Physics Site Visit Program

3. Grand Challenges in Science Education

4. Lessons from Women in Emerging Markets

5. Nigerian Professor of Physics, Fransisca Okeke, Wins 2013 L’Oreal – UNESCO
Women In Science Award

6. Women In Science Disadvantaged: Work By Male Scientists Associated With
Higher Quality

7. Crying at Work

8. 2 Monkeys Were Paid Unequally; See What Happens Next

9. Preliminary Proposals for NSF Physics Frontiers Centers

10. APS Opportunities for Grad Students

11. Must Love Rocks: Stonehenge Is Seeking a 'General Manager'

12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

----------------------------------------------------------------------
1. What Can I Do?
From: Joan Schmelz [jschmelz_at_memphis.edu]

Back in 2009 after the Women in Astronomy III conference, CSWA members and
AASWOMEN readers generated a list of suggestions for graduate students &
postdocs for promoting women in astronomy & creating a female-friendly
workplace. CSWA put these suggestions together in the form on a brochure (yes,
and old-fashioned paper brochure), entitled, "What Can I Do?" A copy that could
be printed out by anyone interested is still on our web site:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/WhatCanIDo.pdf

A quick look will tell you that it is a bit out of date. CSWA would like to make
a new list, and I'm asking for your help. AASWOMEN readers, if you have a
suggestion for the new "What Can I Do?" list, please send it to me at the above
address. Thanks!

----------------------------------------------------------------------
2. APS CSWP Climate for Women in Physics Site Visit Program
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[This week's guest bloggers are Susan Blessing, CSWP Chair and chair of the Site
Visit Subcommittee, and Deanna Ratnikova, CSWP staff liaison and administrative
coordinator for the Site Visit Program. CSWA is proposing to implement Climate
Site Visits for Astronomy Departments, and Susan and Deanna were kind enough to
write this description of the highly successful and much in demand CSWP
program.]

Since 1990, the American Physical Society (APS) Committee on the Status of Women
in Physics (CSWP) has conducted site visits to physics departments at research
institutions and national laboratories to assess and improve the climate for
women. Through the Climate Site Visit Program, a team of physicists visits
physics departments or labs to catalogue the problems that women face and to
suggest potential improvements. The site visit program has been heralded for
leading the physics community to a deeper understanding of the climate for women
physicists in academia.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/04/aps-cswp-climate-for-women-in-physics.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------
3. Grand Challenges in Science Education
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_northwestern.edu]

[Science Magazine has a special issue out this week highlighting STEM
education. Though not specifically about women, many of the articles touch on
issues of inclusion and diversity in science. -eds]

In this special issue of Science, we have invited experts to tell us what
they think are the most important challenges facing science education. Through a
mixture of News, Reviews, Perspectives, Education Forums, and an Editorial, we
explore the obstacles to progress, be they within the classroom, across the
school system, or in the larger social arena. We also offer substantive
suggestions on how to proceed.

Articles in this special issue [Free with registration - Webmaster] can be found at

http://www.sciencemag.org/site/special/education2013/

----------------------------------------------------------------------
4. Lessons from Women in Emerging Markets
From: Hannah Jang-Condell via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

I heard a fascinating story on the radio this morning, on gender equality in
emerging markets.

Naively, one might expect that women might be doing poorly in the business world
in countries like Brazil, Russia, India, and China [BRIC], but that doesn't seem
to be true:

"In India, 11 percent of CEOs of the top companies are female," economist Sylvia
Ann Hewlett tells NPR's Renee Montagne. "The figure here is 3 percent. In
Brazil, 12 percent of CEOs are female. It's also a country with a female head of
state. So we have to understand that in some ways, women in these emerging
markets are pointing the way."

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/04/lessons-from-women-in-emerging-markets.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------
5. Nigerian Professor of Physics, Fransisca Okeke, Wins 2013 L’Oreal – UNESCO Women In Science Award
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_northwestern.edu]

Francisca Okeke, a Professor of Physics at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka has
recently received the L’Oreal-UNESCO for Women in Science Award for her
contribution to the understanding of "daily variations of the ion currents in
the upper atmosphere which may further our understanding of climate change."

To read more, please see

http://www.bellanaija.com/2013/04/19/nigerian-professor-of-physics-fransisca-okeke-
clinches-the-2013-loreal-unesco-women-in-science-award-for-africa-arab-states/

Additional awardees are featured here

http://www.loreal.com/dd/loreal/foundation/Article.aspx?topcode=Foundation_AccessibleScience_
WomenExcellence_U

----------------------------------------------------------------------
6. Women In Science Disadvantaged: Work By Male Scientists Associated With Higher Quality
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]

[Commentary on the study from researchers at Ohio State University, also
featured in last week's newsletter. -eds]

Working in the sciences is notoriously challenging for women -- men outnumber
and out-earn them across the biological, life, physical and social sciences. And
now, new research from Ohio State University has found that, not only are
scientific articles written by men thought to be higher quality than those
written by women, but also that people are more interested in collaborating with
male scientists than female ones.

To read more, please see

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/19/women-in-science-disadvantage-prejudice_
n_3117991.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------
7. Crying at Work
From: Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

[Another article that recalls last week's newsletter -- see Joan Schmelz's
recent post about how advisor's should deal with student tears. -eds.]

Time Magazine recently published an article about the benefits of crying
at work. This article resonated with me because I have cried several times in
professional situations. I cried in my thesis adviser's office when a project I
had been working on for many years seemed to have failed. I cried in my
undergraduate adviser's office as I struggled to write my honors thesis and felt
the deadline looming. Most recently, I cried at work when a coworker asked about
the loss of my relationship, and was I unable to stifle my emotions about it.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/04/crying.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------
8. 2 Monkeys Were Paid Unequally; See What Happens Next
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]

The TED talk clip below has been making the rounds. It demonstrates a monkey's
reaction to less pay for equal work. (It's also pretty funny. I often feel like
the underpaid monkey in the video; sometime I wish I could react the same way!).

http://www.upworthy.com/2-monkeys-were-paid-unequally-see-what-happens-next?g=2&c=upw1

----------------------------------------------------------------------
9. Preliminary Proposals for NSF Physics Frontiers Centers
From: WIPHYS Posting for Apr 24, 2013

The Physics Frontiers Centers (PFC) program supports university-based centers
and institutes where the collective efforts of a larger group of individuals can
enable transformational advances in the most promising research areas. The
program is designed to foster major breakthroughs at the intellectual frontiers
of physics by providing needed resources such as combinations of talents,
skills, disciplines, and/or specialized infrastructure, not usually available to
individual investigators or small groups, in an environment in which the
collective efforts of the larger group can be shown to be seminal to promoting
significant progress in the science and the education of students.

Activities supported through the program are in all sub-fields of physics within
the purview of the Division of Physics: atomic, molecular, optical, plasma,
elementary particle, nuclear, astro-, gravitational, and biological physics.

Preliminary proposals are due August 5.

To learn more, please see

http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2013/nsf13559/nsf13559.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

----------------------------------------------------------------------
10. APS Opportunities for Grad Students
From: WIPHYS Posting for Apr 24, 2013

** Free Webinar: Putting your Science to Work with Peter Fiske

Are you a physics PhD graduate or working towards a physics PhD, and thinking
about your next steps? Are you looking for guidance on how to discover a career
which will tap into your talents, abilities, and interests, as well as pay the
bills? Then join us on May 7 at 2:00 pm ET for this informative webinar by
celebrated author and science career coach Peter Fiske. The webinar is free for
all APS Members.

More information is available at

http://www.aps.org/careers/guidance/webinars/

** FGSA Travel Award for Excellence in Graduate Research

Graduate students who are members of the APS' Forum on Graduate Student Affair
(FGSA) are eligible to apply for a travel award of up to $500. The deadline is
May 20 for conferences in the third quarter of 2013 (July 1st - September 30th).
Decisions will be made by the end of May.

More information available at

http://www.aps.org/units/fgsa/

----------------------------------------------------------------------
11. Must Love Rocks: Stonehenge Is Seeking a 'General Manager'
From: Michele Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

English Heritage, which manages 420 historic properties across Britain, is
looking for "an exceptional senior manager" to oversee the "visitor experience"
at one of the world's most famous historic monuments: Stonehenge.

For more information, please see

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/04/must-love-rocks-stonehenge
-is-seeking-a-general-manager/275174/

----------------------------------------------------------------------
12. How to Submit to the AASWOMEN newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWOMEN newsletter, including replies to topics, send
email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email
address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a
one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWOMEN newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have
subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back
to the email list)

To unsubscribe by email:

Send email to aawlist+unsubscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have
UNsubscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

https://groups.google.com/a/aas.org/group/aaswlist/

You will have to create a Google Account if you do not already have one, using

https://accounts.google.com/newaccount?hl=en

Google Groups Subscribe Help:

http://support.google.com/groups/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=46606

----------------------------------------------------------------------
14. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.