AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of November 22, 2013
eds: Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, & Nicolle Zellner
 
This week's issues:
 
1. Professional Development at the 2014 Winter AAS Meeting
2. I am sorry this blog post is late
3. Sponsorship: the New Hammer to Crack the Glass Ceiling
4. Women Who Changed Modern American Science
5. Jocelyn Bell Burnell's Talk at CERN
6. Something about STEM drives women out
7. Diversity in Science   
8. Women Score Lower Than Men on Physics Assessments - Except in This Kind of Classroom
9. HuffPost's Girls In STEM Mentorship Program
10. GoldieBlox: The Engineering Toy for Girls
11. Job Opportunities
12. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter
13. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter
14. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter
 
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1. Professional Development at the 2014 Winter AAS Meeting
From: Laura Trouille via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
 
The number of professional development opportunities at the annual AAS meeting
seems to grow every year. And the upcoming January meeting is no exception. This
year's conference features workshops, panel discussions, and talks on everything
from Python programming to interviewing skills to changing demographics to
maintaining a healthy work-life balance.
 
To see a list of the career and skills development sessions, please see
 
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/11/professional-development-at-2014-winter.html
 
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2. I am sorry this blog post is late
From:  David Charbonneau via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
 
I am sorry this blog post is late. I meant to post it Monday. Yes, the blog is
important! But I think my daughter might have lice and I had to deal with that
urgently.
 
I am sorry I can't accept the invitation to speak at the conference. Yes, I do
want the meeting to be a success.  But we have four children and the family
simply doesn't do well when I am away.
 
I am sorry that I can't write a letter in support of the promotion. Yes, the
candidate is doing great work, and I feel terrible that I can't add my
enthusiastic support to assist this junior person. But I get 25 such requests a
year, and my weekends are full with math homework, hockey, and girl scouts.
 
To read more, please see
 
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/11/i-am-sorry-this-blog-post-is-late.html
 
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3. Sponsorship: the New Hammer to Crack the Glass Ceiling
From:  Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
 
My recent posts on Unconscious Bias include a personal story, the legacy of
patriarchy, schemas, and studies from sociology. You can probably tell that it
is a subject that interests me greatly. Therefore, I was delighted to find an
article in Sunday's Washington Post that sheds new light on our biases as well
as the importance of "Sponsorships," which are different from "Mentorships" in
ways that are vital to promotion and success.
 
To read more, please see
 
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/11/sponsorship-new-hammer-to-crack-glass.html
 
To read more of the interview with Kent Gardiner, please see
 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/chair-of-major-law-firm-champions-sponsorship-pilot-
program/2013/11/13/eea437f4-4be2-11e3-ac54-aa84301ced81_story.html
 
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4.  Women who Changed Modern American Science
From:  Jessica Kirkpatrick via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com
 
The Boston meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
(AAAS) in February, 2013, included a session on the history of women in science.
This article summarizes the presentation by Margaret Rossiter, which was
entitled "Thirty Women Who Changed American Science, 1970-2010" and was based on
the third in her series of books, Women Scientists in America. It described the
changes these women wrought, not by means of scientific research, but rather by
means of political and legal activity. Every woman who began a career in science
in the 1970's and later owes them a great debt.
 
To read more, please see
 
http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/11/women-who-changed-modern-american.html
 
This article, written by Nancy Morrison, also appears in the June 2013 issue of Status.
 
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5. Jocelyn Bell Burnell's Talk at CERN
From: David Anderson [danderson_at_albion.edu]
 
As part of CERN's program on diversity, Jocelyn Bell Burnell recently presented
information on the status of women in astronomy. She gives a nice summary of the
numbers of women in astronomy in countries around the world and presents her
conclusions about these data.
 
To listen to this talk and see the presentation slides, please see
 
http://cds.cern.ch/record/1625808
 
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6. Something about STEM drives women out
From: Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
 
In the December issue of Social Forces, Sharon Sassler, a professor of policy
analysis and management, and her colleagues report that, since women leave STEM
careers before they get married or have children, there is "something unique
about the STEM climate that results in women leaving."
 
To read more about how the authors interpreted the results of a longitudinal
survey, please see
 
http://phys.org/news/2013-11-stem-women.html
 
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7. Diversity in Science      
From:  Nicolle Zellner [nzellner_at_albion.edu]
 
Using Marie Curie's birthday as a time to reflect on the status of women in
science, Ivy Kupec has written a nice summary article. It sheds light on Curie's
life and also describes some progress in the number of girls in high school
physics classes, the number of women faculty in physics departments, and the
number of women in leadership positions at the National Science Foundation.
 
To read more, please see
 
http://phys.org/news/2013-11-diversity-science.html
 
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8. Women Score Lower Than Men on Physics Assessments - Except in This Kind of Classroom
From: WIPHYS, November 11, 2013
 
In an upcoming Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education
Research article, authors A. Madsen, S. B. McKagan, and E. C. Sayre report
on their recent study of how young men and women perform on standardized tests
and specifically, on physics concept inventories.  While they found that women
consistently scored lower than men in both the pre- and post- tests, the authors
report that "the performance of both men and women is improved when they
experience an interactive classroom."
 
To read more about this study, please see
 
http://www.science20.com/news_articles/women_score_lower_men_physics_assessments_except_
kind_classroom-123663
 
See also
 
http://www.psmag.com/education/gender-gap-boggles-even-physicists-69622/
 
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9. HuffPost's Girls In STEM Mentorship Program
From: WIPHYS, November 11, 2013
 
As part of a series to promote the importance of encouraging young girls to
enter STEM disciplines, The Huffington Post offers two recent articles.  "Be a
Verb" and "Closing the STEM Gender Gap" describe why it is important to
encourage young girls to study STEM and what we can do to mentor them. 
 
To read more of these personal anecdotes, please see
 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-michelle-larson-/be-a-verb_b_4241858.html
 
and
 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/celia-islam/closing-the-stem-gender-g_b_3779893.html
 
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10. GoldieBlox: The Engineering Toy for Girls
From: Caroline Simpson [simpsonc_at_fiu.edu]
 
Debbie Sterling, a Stanford engineer, has designed "a construction toy + book
series starring Goldie, the kid inventor who loves to build."  With women making
up just 11% of engineers, her motivation in creating "GoldieBlox" was to
"inspire girls the way Legos and Erector sets have inspired boys, for over 100
years, to develop an early interest and skill set in engineering."
 
To learn about the founder's motivations for starting the company (and her pitch
for funding), please see
 
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/16029337/goldieblox-the-engineering-toy-for-girls
 
To watch the clever video promoting the new game, please see
 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/19/goldieblox-beastie-boys-girls-music-video-_n_
4296908.html
 
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11.  Job Opportunities
 
For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their
organizations, a list of resources and advice is here: 
http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease
 
-          Postdoctoral Position in Exoplanet Research, Wesleyan University
http://jobregister.aas.org/job_view?JobID=45853
 
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12. How to Submit to the AASWomen newsletter
 
To submit an item to the AASWomen newsletter, including replies to
topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org
 
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address.
 
When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a
one-line description and a link to the full job posting.
 
Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.
 
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14. Access to Past Issues
 
http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html  
 
Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.
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