AAS Committee on the Status of Women
Issue of December 13, 2013
eds: Michele M. Montgomery, Daryl Haggard, Nick Murphy, & Nicolle Zellner

This week's issues:

1. Childcare at the 2014 AAS Winter Meeting

2. Is science is in the eye of the beholder? [Hint: NO]

3. ADVICE: Workplace Bullying in Astronomy III

4. Gender Progress(?)

5. NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative: A Small Success Story

6. Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students

7. Stephanie Slater is the December CSWP Woman Physicist of the Month

8. Women in Science: Standing on the Edge

9. The Huffington Post's Girls in STEM Mentorship Program

10. New Email List: Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics

11. 2014 Katherine Weimer Award

12. 2014 Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week's First-to-Solo Challenge

13. Job Opportunities

14. How to Submit to the AASWomen Newsletter

15. How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen Newsletter

16. Access to Past Issues of the AASWomen Newsletter

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1. Childcare at the 2014 AAS Winter Meeting
From: Kelly Clark [kelly.clark_at_aas.org]

The AAS has contracted with KiddieCorp for childcare services at the upcoming
winter meeting. The registration deadline has been extended to December 20th,
and the KiddieCorp registration link is

https://www.kiddiecorp.com/aaskids.htm

AAS Childcare Grant applicants were notified earlier this week; if you are still
awaiting information on your childcare grant, please contact Kelly Clark, AAS
Chief Finance Officer, at the email address above.

Kelly is also soliciting your opinions about the childcare options at AAS
meetings. Do you have thoughts on the childcare services that the AAS provides?
Do you have thoughts on how the AAS can better share information about these
services? Please contact Kelly directly if you would like to share your input
and/or experiences.

Thank you for taking time to respond to these inquires. Childcare has been and
will continue to be a concern of the AAS Council.

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2. Is science is in the eye of the beholder? [Hint: NO]
From: John Johnson via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This week we have another guest post by Renee Hlozek, a postdoctoral researcher
at Princeton University. Take it away, Renee!

We all have bias. If you think you don't, try this eye-opening test on implicit
bias from Project Implicit (https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/). It'll make
you think.

But while we're getting much better on average at identifying obvious forms of
bias and sexism (at least I feel there is forward momentum!), one form of sexism
is much more subtle: benevolent sexism. Rather than just giving a definition of
the term, I'm going to try and relate what happened to me as an example and
explain how this well-meaning person made me so angry and frustrated that I had
to take a few (many) moments away from my colleagues to calm myself.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/12/is-science-is-in-eye-of-beholder-hint-no.html

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3. ADVICE: Workplace Bullying in Astronomy III
From: Joan Schmelz via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

This is the final post in a series on workplace bullying. It is about the
delicious fantasies of revenge. Remember the old adage, "Revenge is a dish best
served cold." This tells us that the best payback is the one that comes with
planning. Revenge can be sweet (and tempting!), but be careful. If you are in a
position to plan revenge, make sure that your scheme will not backfire and put
you in an even worse situation. Here are a few sweet revenge stories from a
great reference on workplace bullying entitled, The No Asshole Rule: Building a
Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn't by Robert I. Sutton.

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/12/advice-workplace-bullying-in-astronomy.html

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4. Gender Progress(?)
From: Michele M. Montgomery [montgomery_at_physics.ucf.edu]

The proportions of women scientists in Nature and as referees are still too low
even though some success has been made in visibility of women in the pages of
Nature.

To read more on Nature's house cleaning, please see

http://www.nature.com/news/gender-progress-1.14334?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20131212

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5. NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative: A Small Success Story
From: Laura Trouille via womeninastronomy.blogspot.com

Guest Post: The below post was submitted anonymously by an astronomy post-doc.

I recently was in one of those exciting conversations with an NSF Program
Officer in which s/he is providing feedback from the review panel that is
suggestive that your grant has been approved for funding given a few minor
tweaks.

Then the bomb dropped. NSF would like the start date to be in the coming few
months and the program to launch this summer. *PANIC. I am a post doc just
ending the first trimester of my first pregnancy, I haven't yet told my advisor
who is also on the phone, and I am due at the start of the summer, exactly when
the NSF would like for the program to launch.*

To read more, please see

http://womeninastronomy.blogspot.com/2013/12/nsfs-career-life-balance-initiative.html

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6. Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students
From: Beatrice Bonga 

[An interesting article published in the  American Physical Society's Physical
Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research by Hazari et al. -eds]

Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students:
Testing five common hypotheses

There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students
to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods
on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering
(PRiSE) project (n=7505), we test the following five commonly held beliefs
regarding what factors might impact females’ physical science career interest:
(i) having a single-sex physics class, (ii) having a female physics teacher,
(iii) having female scientist guest speakers in physics class, (iv) discussing
the work of female scientists in physics class, and (v) discussing the
underrepresentation of women in physics class. The effect of these experiences
on physical science career interest is compared for female students who are
matched on several factors, including prior science interests, prior mathematics
interests, grades in science, grades in mathematics, and years of enrollment in
high school physics. No significant effects are found for single-sex classes,
female teachers, female scientist guest speakers, and discussing the work of
female scientists. However, discussions about women’s underrepresentation have a
significant positive effect.

To read more, please

http://prst-per.aps.org/abstract/PRSTPER/v9/i2/e020115

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7. Stephanie Slater is the December CSWP Woman Physicist of the Month
From: WIPHYS Posting for Dec 09, 2013

Stephanie J. Slater is a physics & astronomy education researcher who has been
innovating in astronomy teaching and learning for nearly twenty years. Dr.
Slater is the Executive Director of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics
Education Research where her scholarship focuses on understanding the underlying
cognitive mechanisms undergraduates use when engaging in the physics and
astronomy. She is deeply interested in how undergraduate students and future
teachers approach and engage in science.

To learn more, please see

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/womanmonth/2013.cfm

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8. Women in Science: Standing on the Edge
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_northwestern.edu]

By Adele Gulfo, President, Pfizer Latin America

Although spending declined this Black Friday weekend as compared with 2012, 141
million people -- about 2 million more than last year -- shopped both online and
in stores, according to a survey commissioned by the National Retail Federation.

With the holiday shopping season clearly in full swing, an online ad for
GoldieBlox, a startup toy company that sells games and books designed to
introduce engineering basics to girls, recently went viral. The ad caught my
attention -- and that of the millions of others who have since viewed it -- for
a few reasons.

To read more, please see

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/adele-gulfo/women-in-science-standing_b_4385713.html

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9. The Huffington Post's Girls in STEM Mentorship Program
From: Daryl Haggard [dhaggard_at_northwestern.edu]

[An editor's note in the above article pointed to this program, which may be of
interest to our community. -eds]

Join the Huffington Post's Girls in STEM Mentorship Program to explore a
discussion of STEM education and careers, the issues facing women in STEM, and
what it takes to be a mentor to females in these fields.

Here's the home page for the program

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/girls-in-stem/

The sign up for their newsletter can be found here

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/17/girls-in-stem-newsletter_n_3614271.html?
utm_hp_ref=girls-in-stem

And here's an early announcement, with more details on joining the effort

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rebecca-searles/stem-mentorship-program_b_2288918.html

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10. New Email List: Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics
From: WIPHYS Posting for Dec 09, 2013

A new email list has been created to share news, announcements, and deadlines
related to the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics. To join the list,
email women_at_aps.org with the subject "Subscription to CUWiP email list".

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11. 2014 Katherine Weimer Award
From: WIPHYS Posting for Dec 09, 2013

The Weimer award is open to any female plasma scientist who received her Ph.D.
within the ten-year period prior to April 1, 2014. Nominations are active for
one selection cycle (three years). The award consists of $2,000 and funds for
travel to the annual meeting where the award is to be presented. The recipient
will be invited to give a talk at the Division’s annual meeting.

Deadline is April 1, 2014.

Details are available here

http://www.aps.org/programs/women/scholarships/katherineweimer.cfm

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12. 2014 Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week's First-to-Solo Challenge
From: Matthew Greenhouse [matthew.a.greenhouse_at_nasa.gov]

The Institute for Women Of Aviation Worldwide is delighted to announce that one
of its founding members, Sennheiser, will award $1,500 USD for flight training
to the winner of the 2014 Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week’s First-to-Solo
Challenge.

Any girl or woman, anywhere around the world, who goes on a discovery flight
during the 2014 Women Of Aviation Worldwide Week, March 3-9 2014, may be
eligible to win the prize.

To learn more, please see

http://www.womenofaviationweek.org/blog/first-solo-challenge-grand-prize-1500-usd-
training/article-5770/#

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13. Job Opportunities

For those interested in increasing excellence and diversity in their
organizations, a list of resources and advice is here:

http://www.aas.org/cswa/diversity.html#howtoincrease

* Visiting Scientists in Astrophysics at NASA HQ, Washington, D.C.
 http://jobregister.aas.org/job_view?JobID=46612

* Tenure-Track Assistant Professor at Hofstra University
 http://www.higheredjobs.com/search/details.cfm?JobCode=175830648

* Staff Scientist - Soft X-ray Optics Development and Implementation
 https://lbl.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?lang=en&job=76377

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14. How to Submit to the AASWomen newsletter

To submit an item to the AASWomen newsletter, including replies to
topics, send email to aaswomen_at_aas.org

All material will be posted unless you tell us otherwise, including your email
address.

When submitting a job posting for inclusion in the newsletter, please include a
one-line description and a link to the full job posting.

Please remember to replace "_at_" in the e-mail address above.

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15.  How to Subscribe or Unsubscribe to the AASWomen newsletter

Join AAS Women List by email:

Send email to aaswlist+subscribe_at_aas.org from the address you want to have
subscribed. You can leave the subject and message blank if you like.

Be sure to follow the instructions in the confirmation email. (Just reply back
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To unsubscribe by email:

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To join or leave AASWomen via web, or change your membership settings:

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16. Access to Past Issues

http://www.aas.org/cswa/AASWOMEN.html

Each annual summary includes an index of topics covered.

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to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.

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-- 
Dr. Daryl Haggard
CIERA Fellow, Northwestern University
Dearborn Observatory
2131 Tech Drive
Evanston, IL 60208-2900
http://ciera.northwestern.edu/dhaggard

To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aaswlist+unsubscribe@aas.org.